Tag Archives: GCWB

GCWB Front Cover Epubli copyWe are celebrating a book launch party of “The Global Career Workbook”.

 

The book launch event will take place on 7 July 2016 from 6 pm to 8 pm at GAINSBOURG in Seefeld, Zurich.

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Martina has not been able to find a new job for six months. It’s not because of her qualifications. She is well qualified. She has work experience. She says it might be her self-confidence and that she gets nervous in interviews. She thinks one of the reasons for her lack of success in securing a job is that she is very realistic about her skills and when asked in an interview she is honest.

Successful people aren’t honest.

That’s the message she got.

I think, successful people are not dis-honest, but they are better at conveying who they are and how they contribute to the world. They are better storytellers (and they don’t suffer from imposture syndrome).

You need to learn “Self-Marketing” and not just work away like an ant.

 

Secret

I have made the same mistake in my earlier career. I worked away and hoped that someone would notice. I saw male friends getting promotions faster, saw them earn more and some of my female colleagues also surpassed me. With a delay of a few years I did well too.

I think I only got better at communicating to my manager what I was doing and how I contributed to the success of the team. I asked for weekly meetings and sometimes even wrote quarterly summaries. I only had this idea because a former manager told me to communicate more. Had she not told me I would probably still sit in that same office.

Another manager showed me how to improve my self-marketing. She recommended a number of great books to me. She also gave me “Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway”. After reading the book, I resigned from my managerial role officially to start my own company Global People Transitions GmbH.

I care for Martina. I want her to succeed and do everything to help her but her story might be different than yours or mine.

Tell me how you show your contribution to the workplace on a weekly basis and if you want to discuss this please schedule a meeting with me.

 


It’s 2016. If you are not on LinkedIn you must either be a trust fund baby or you live in a world that I don’t know. I have encountered job seekers and “solopreneurs”, who still believe that they can thrive in today’s world without a digital presence. In short, they refuse social and professional networking as they feel they will be stalked or annoyed by others.pablo (2)

I started with online networking on XING in 2004. Before that, I only networked in P2P-Style. That means I would regularly have lunch with different internal and external colleagues to find out about what is going on in their line of work. In the early Millenium, the lunch date roster was your “dance card” and showed how popular you were. It was almost embarrassing to lunch alone and if you were booked for several weeks this meant you had made it. It was part of the culture of that organisation but networking helped me to understand background stories, to build trust and get support on a variety of topics.
If I look back I also pulled my team members, trainers, providers and friends of my network. The network expanded to external contacts and it got harder to maintain when I left Frankfurt for Zurich, but I started to build a new network, which helped me to build and maintain a start-up in a rather difficult economic environment. If I was looking for a full-time role now, I would certainly try and source it through my network. If I am looking to hire an intern, designer or specialist I am going to rely on my network.
I don’t really understand why professionals are afraid to put themselves out there. It must be fear of rejection or fear of identity theft. Let’s assume for this post that you want to be successful in your job search or you want to gain clients as a “solopreneur”.
If you don’t expose yourself on Digital Media the message I get from you is either
1) I am not self-confident at all and my professional experience has zero value.
2) I am a diva and so popular that people will look for me.
3) I am a digital marketing professional and hiding because I already worked it all out and will have enough work anyway.
If you don’t want to create that impression you might need to overcome your fear first. So here are my seven killer tips for developing a digital media presence.
1) Focus on the Platform where your potential Hiring Managers and Clients hang out.
In all likelihood, you will meet most of your potential hiring managers and clients on LinkedIn. If you are a writer you might want to focus on Twitter or Goodreads because this is where readers will gather their information. On the other hand, if you provide make-up tips on short videos you should focus on youtube. As a photographer, you want to be on Instagram. Try not to overwhelm yourself by joining all platforms as one. In case, you don’t know where to go try Facebook first.
2) Develop your own blog so you have a digital home base but don’t expect people to find you right away.
In times of social media, it is hard to understand why you need to have your digital home. Imagine it this way: When you are on Twitter it is like you are attending a huge networking event where you exchange information with colleagues and potential clients. If you want them to look at information (content) that you produce you have to invite them to your home. And when you host a party at your place you have to give people directions how to find you and a good reason to party with you. When you go to a party you don’t expect to be asked to buy something or pay for your beer right.
3) Selling online will take a while so build trust first.
The Internet is full of offers and scam. Before anyone wants to give you their email ID and bank details you will need to have their trust. You can develop trust by being a helpful source of information and by solving people’s problems. You can also build trust by being personal and by avoiding any salesy touch.
4) Self-promotion is a turnoff.
Instead of promoting yourself you should help and promote other people’s work. If you help others you will not come across as a big-headed egomaniac but someone who cares about people.
5) Vet and check the information you share.
A retweet does not always mean that you endorse the opinion of the tweeter but at least you can verify that the information is genuine, up-to-date and that links are actually working. If you are like me you probably don’t read everything you would like to read but you know where to find the trusted sources and where to be skeptical.
 
6) It’s helpful if you encourage others to develop content and if you endorse your colleagues.
I know many people who suffer from imposture syndrome and who are modest. It helps once in a while to be told that work is helpful and that you are actually reading their updates or their input.
7) When people meet you in RL they should like you even more.
Digital Presence is great. If people deal with you in real life (RL) they should still be positively surprised. One of the reasons for lack of trust nowadays is that everyone is putting their own interest in front. Many people have a hard time to accept support because they are not used to genuine help. They are used to being cheated and pulled over the table and you want to stand out.
I hope these seven killer tips will help you to work on your digital presence as a job-seeker or solopreneur without getting overwhelmed. If you need my support please schedule a meeting with me.
Angie
PS: If you are struggling with career related topics such as this one you might want to read The Global Career Workbook.

I know around three books on “intercultural coaching”. The best one has been written by my former housemate Kirsten Nazarkiewicz. Great minds live in the same building. Kirsten was ten years ago where I wanted to be now. She was an intercultural coach when no one knew what that meant.

1st principle of intercultural effectivenessWhile the term “Intercultural Coach” seems to have meaning in Germany it is not commonly known in Switzerland. There are different approaches to “intercultural coaching” and the term “interculturalist” is not used in Switzerland a lot. What we do is coaching professionals through an intercultural transition ideally improving their effectiveness by increasing intercultural competence on different levels.

In our business (Global People Transitions GmbH – the name says is all) it means coaching in an intercultural transition context or coaching of global managers.

We integrate developing intercultural effectiveness into all our programs as we feel it is a key competence for global leaders, in client service and global team performance. For our client selection it means that we value intercultural diversity.

Why it can sometimes be a burden to be an intercultural coach

The Swiss culture in my view tends to value the opposite. It’s based on excluding rather than including. If you look at how “Switzerland” was founded it is very obvious why the people learnt through generation to protect each other from the enemies outside. What started with the Ruetlischwur in 1291 is still in the mindset of the culture. (I call this concept “The Circle of Trust” in my best Robert de Niro-Voice).

The other reason is that in my personal life I spend time with people from different cultural backgrounds. The multitude of experiences and lifestyles sometimes clashes. There are situations in my life where I have to get up and leave a discussion because I cannot handle it emotionally. It often happens when differing religious and political views are at the table.

While I consider myself open and tolerant I have a strong value-based attitude that is biased towards “Germanic” logic and values. My approach can get into my way. I get frustrated when clients or friends have a different approach.

As most people I tend to overestimate my intercultural sensitivity and I am not as great in this topic when I get under pressure. As most of us I fall back into my “cultural default” (citing Sundae Schneider-Bean, another outstanding intercultural coach and trainer) when under stress.

My seven Principles for Intercultural Effectiveness

When I am asked in a coaching or training: “So what do you do about that?” I have to say that I try and fail or in most cases I eventually succeed if I follow those seven principles.

1) I try harder and show more patience.

2) I watch my conclusion from other angles.

3) I am more compassionate.

4) I give people a third and fourth chance.

5) I trust even if I had been hurt before.

6) I listen to my heart.

7) I speak slow and use simple language.

What I have learnt over the years working across cultures that we have a lot more potential to be compassionate without judging. We just need to learn to reevaluate our conclusions and judgements. We need to give people a fourth and fifth chance and we need to accept them how they are. Then we are true humans, we are able to forgive and we’ll have improving performances in our global teams.

If you struggle with the same topics contact me for a Skype session.

Read also:

http://globalpeopletransitions.com/tag/7-principles-of-intercultural-effectiveness/