Tag Archives: Mindfulness

Sometimes we all experiences phases in our lives when everything seems to drag along or harder than usual. In other times we are full of energy and ready to take life by storm. You probably understand already that your energy level and exhaustion does not always correlate to a number of hours you work.

Sometimes you might be drained by other factors. It might even be your personal life that is creating an imbalance. In my experience, most of the issues we face are born in our head. Once we learn to control our thoughts, we can almost control the universe (almost…do not try to challenge me on this one).

Do you remember the last time you almost had a nervous breakdown over a small error you made or the last fight you had with a loved one for something that seemed meaningless in hindsight?

Are you sometimes asking yourself what triggers these emotional reactions when you explode or break into tears out of nowhere? The issue is simpler than you think and at the same time more irrational than you think. It’s probably related to your early childhood. Unless you want to go through a long deep therapeutic process I want to advise you to observe your behavior and your judgment.

There are also a few actions you can take to rid yourself of unnecessary blockages.

Clean up your home and office space

Sometimes we feel blocked because we lost touch with ourselves, with our priorities and our purpose. In that case, it is useless to sit in front of a white sheet of paper ruminating about what we would like to do with our lives. It is better to shift your focus to cleaning up your home and office space. Throw out anything you don’t use or if you feel you will use it again try to put it in your cellar.

http://globalpeopletransitions.com/how-to-get-rid-of-clutter-in-five-steps-spring-cleaning-for-more-productivity/

Use Housework as a Meditation Practice

Create more balance between your head and your body by going through your household tasks with dedicated Zen-like attitude. Focus fully on the task at hand, let your mind enjoy music or listen to a podcast while you iron shirts, clean the bathroom and do the dishes. You might want to take up a regular practice such as meditation, yoga, aikido or golf.
http://www.agility3.com/blog/learning-golf-rememering-rilke-and-the-secret-to-a-perfect-lawn

Battle Stress by Looking at the Root Cause

If you constantly feel anxious, get too little sleep or you seek distractions with medicines, drugs, alcohol, gambling, sex, work and other additions you might want to seek a therapist. In the long run, you will benefit from going through this rough phase but you probably won’t manage alone or without a support group. Maybe it will also help you to follow our advice on how to get in control again when stress weighs you down.
http://globalpeopletransitions.com/when-stress-weighs-you-down-three-quickies-to-get-in-control-again/

Kind regards
Angie Weinberger

PS: If you feel you only need a few small optimizations to claim back your diary you might want to try these seven tips.

http://globalpeopletransitions.com/my-favourite-productivity-hacks-seven-tips-to-claim-back-your-diary/

By Caitlin Krause

A new calendar year prompts a feeling of open possibility, and a curiosity to discover and realize our greatest potentials, in business and beyond. We’re undoubtedly living in times of rapid change and high demand; times of immense challenge. I certainly feel it– all I need to do is glance at daily news headlines to have a feeling of perspective and urgency.

We want to ensure that the work we’re doing is valued; we want to know that it matters, and matches our own personal goals and resolutions (which, let’s face it, span far beyond the hype and trend of the new year). We strive to maintain a sense of balance, as we navigate this complex world, maintaining focus and resilience, while maximizing our capabilities. In addition, the global corporate culture and increased connectivity require even more flexibility, and broader skill sets that encompass a range of intelligences, including emotional intelligence and empathy.

Instead of feeling daunted, it’s the ideal time for us to invite some mindfulness into the equation. Here we are in a complex, fascinating environment, ripe with opportunity. The field of global mobility and intercultural exchange has never been more exciting– and, there has never been a higher demand for everyone to develop these skills and abilities, across all industries and vocations. It’s a time when adopting a modern, holistic global competency model is imperative– one that embraces a flexible, resilient mindset. Integrating mindfulness values and practices into a model of global competency makes perfect sense, and has significant long-term benefits for career, health, well-being and happiness.

I have a client who travels between five hub cities, located in three separate continents, on a regular basis. In each place, she has a slightly different lifestyle, and varied expectations to fulfill the job requirement. When she discovered the uses mindfulness has in increasing flexibility, resilience, and stress management, she was amazed at the positive impact. Mindfulness, and specifically the methods I’ve developed, can be summed up by 3 A’s: awareness, advancement, and authenticity. I custom-design mindfulness programs that are experiential, practical, and sustainable. By focusing on providing support, engagement, personalization and expertise, individuals can build on the traditional dimensions of the Global Competency Model described by Weinberger (2016) that are already well-recognized in truly diverse intercultural competency programs.

The connection between global competency and mindfulness is clear, and it’s enhanced my own experience. When I first moved overseas to Belgium, I was busy teaching, coaching, and adjusting to the new environment at the same time– plus, setting up a home. I was impatient with myself for struggling with my basic-level French; at the same time, I didn’t yet anticipate the cultural norms that take time to adjust to– everything from taking a ticket as a number to stand in line at the bakery to the fact that all stores are closed on Sundays, which was the one day that I didn’t coach or teach full-time– this was constantly a surprise, and my initial reaction was to look at my own naïveté as a form of failure.

Mindfulness taught me to flip this concept– I embraced my own enhanced awareness, celebrating the foibles that I could then laugh about, convincing myself that someday they will become part of a book (which could be a Bill Bryson spinoff titled: “Bumbling through Belgium”). I began to feel gratitude for my vitality– for the very feeling, uncomfortable at times, that reminds me that I’m alive(!). I felt immensely grateful for the mix of backgrounds and experiences that create the unexpected. I also grew to appreciate that a population is not homogenous, yet we share underlying truths and a certain mutual respect and dignity. These insights are also embedded in mindfulness– an appreciation for what is, in the moment, even as we set-goals and look toward the emerging future.

In a globalised working culture, mindfulness is especially valuable because it gives agency back to the individual. It gave me a better sense of stability, even in situations that were beyond my ability to anticipate and fully control. Because of this, mindfulness also increased my connection capacity in place of fragmentation. In other words, I was able to reach out and connect with others more easily, because I was more self-aware and had developed skills of resiliency. I was confident, not despite my challenges, but because of them. In Stanford researcher Carol Dweck’s seminal book Mindset, she relates this capacity to growth mindset, and it’s all about mindfulness, self-awareness, and embracing the rigor instead of denying or avoiding it.

We live in the midst of a global corporate climate that is rife with burnout, stress and depression. Recent studies cite stress and burnout as the top threat to workplace health, resulting in great losses across all quality measurement areas, including employee work satisfaction, job retention, company culture, and revenue. The rate of burnout continues to increase each year; mindfulness is seen as a top strategy and method to provide burnout prevention. Instead of succumbing to this threatening trend, looking at establishing an environment that promotes the best, most adaptive and advantageous state of well-being is the answer for global leadership.

As a burnout prevention measure, stress reducer, leadership and confidence booster, creativity cultivator, and overall well-being motivator and life enhancer, mindfulness serves as a necessary base layer for a holistic model of leadership, learning and global competency. For me, it’s a lens to look through, and it can be applied to just about everything.

This could be why, when I’m asked to define mindfulness, I call it simply: “a way to be in the world”– with awareness (understanding of surrounding context), advancement (having a sense of purpose), and authenticity (detaching from judgment; focusing on situations while maintaining resilience). I use these three A’s as foundational pillars for designing applications and programs.

Being globally competent involves developing a wide range of capacities– and, the ability to truly reflect on the learning experience and acknowledge the complexity of global systems involves great awareness– including cultural awareness, emotional awareness and self awareness.

I apply this philosophy with many different practical approaches, making it real, personal, holistic, and able to be experienced by each individual in a powerful way. In addition, it reinforces the sense of community, which is perfectly in-line with global mobility dimensions of supporting the whole person in a long-term, reflective approach that encompasses a multitude of lifelong learning facets and personal experiences.

Recognizing our own multi-dimensional natures and experiences, this makes perfect sense, allowing us to build our abilities and reach goals while staying grounded in this complex, inter-connected global landscape. Combining mindfulness and global competency could yield a new, even more powerful concept: mindful global competency. Let’s test it out!

Kicking off the New Year, I have already dedicated myself to several aspirations and goals, many of which are definitely “curiosity-driven” pursuits, all embedded in a framework of mindful global competency. I’ll invite you to try out a few exercises, to test the process for yourself and give it a go. See what it feels like to sit down and write your own answers to the following. Just go with where your reflections take you, in the moment, without over-thinking:

  • Awareness: Record something, in a description, that made you happy yesterday. Include as many of the five senses as possible. For example, if you were happy when you went for a hike in the woods, try to describe the temperature, the feel of it, the colors and sights around you, etc. Try to bring yourself back there through the writing.
  • Advancing: Write down three attributes that you have that you value in yourself– these could be any quality, from trustworthiness to funny to For each quality, what is a life situation that you have experienced– an “anecdote”– that illustrates it in your life? Feel free to think of examples that have humor. Could you practice by sharing this out loud with someone else? Sometimes, these illustrated moments make for great connection points, yet we deny ourselves the right to “own them” and appreciate them.
  • Authentic: Think back to an experience where the time itself was not what you expected in the short term, yet it offered some sort of long-term benefit. Describe the situation in detail, using a “before” perspective (anticipation), a “during” (experience), and an “after” (reflection). What do you appreciate about it now, in hindsight? How do you think it adds some flavor and dimension to your life?

Sometimes, just taking time to record our own reflections and thoughts about these experiences can lend us deeper clarity and insight. For me, building components of writing and storytelling into my mindfulness practice adds an extra layer of appreciation, insight, and what I call “connection capacity”. May it add to your life, too. After all, 2017 is wide open with possibility, and we all want to make the most of that!

Wishing you a wonderful year, filled with surprise and delight, enjoying the ride.

Caitlin

 

Guest post by Caitlin Krause, Founder & CEO, MindWise.

Caitlin Krause  is a creative collaborator  with a curiosity-driven mindset. As the founder of MindWise, she’s a writer, storyteller, teacher, speaker, VR designer, artist and leadership specialist. Her passion for active, sustainable, ethically-driven leadership and learning models drives her work. 

Empowering personal and organizational change, MindWise’s core “AAA” values are: Aware, Advancing, and Authentic. Caitlin integrates best practices and new discoveries about creativity, neuroscience, mindfulness and technology to promote immersive empathetic experiences on a local and global scale. 

 

Reference:

Weinberger, A. (2016): The Global Mobility Workbook, print ed., Global People Transitions, Zurich


Walking has a positive effect on your brain and helps you to relax. When your life is stuck and you feel like you are not moving ahead running in a rat race it might be time to walk. It could be that your professional life is where you strive and feel happy but your personal life just does not feel right. One of the reasons is that you might be a victim of “time management” and optimization. We often do not get the results we aspire because we are running after them. We are trying to achieve too many goals at the same time. We’ve learnt how to set SMART goals and we push these on everything we do. We have learnt to optimize our time, to prioritize and to tick of tasks from our To-Do list. All in the name of “productivity”. This worked well in the past but is “efficiency” really the best way to handle your life overall? When we push all those ideas from management by objectives on to our personal lives we might face resistance sooner or later.

“People in our lives don’t function like subordinates in business.” via @angieweinberger 

 

The best way to deal with this in my view is to take time out to review what we really want for our life. We also need to challenge our own expectations and judgements of others. Do they stem from real observation and listening? Or are we projecting our own wishes and judgements into another person?

“Take A Walk” is an experiment in mindful leadership where you learn methods for self-reflection, peer consulting and also creative writing. You learn to challenge your past thinking and start to work on a vision for your future. If you are interested in working with us please email to angela@globalpeopletransitions.com.

Angie

PS: From 2018 we will offer an 8-day retreat as well. Watch out for our offer by subscribing to the weekly “Global People Club Sandwich”

 

 

by Caitlin Krause

I must admit, I initially went to see Spectre in the theater for one prime reason: eye candy. Yes, my motivation was all about the external appeal: I wanted to dive into a light panoplied spectacle that’s equal parts engaging and artificial; to lose myself in iconic imagery, and to revel in watching easy-on-the-eyes Daniel Craig as James Bond in the flesh.

SE_Seamaster300_Spectre_videoPreview_1600x900

Why is Bond so palatable, across generations, sexes, cultures and creeds? Bond is as familiar as he is idolized; men want to be him; women want to date him. Or, women want to be him and men want to date him — it actually doesn’t matter how you slice it; he’s an archetype for the ages; a brand’s dream. Now, with everything from 007 drinks to anti-perspirant, there’s a whole range of products catering to those who want to “be Bond” (or, at least, smell like him).

So, what’s the secret that makes Bond stick? It’s an appeal that’s much deeper than skin. Yes, he’s the quintessential sexy Brit — yet, he also represents something universally appealing to our core sensibility as humans.

Spy and agent activity aside, the following five aspects of Bond’s behavior are mindful hallmarks:

1 — He’s self-directed. James Bond understands the bigger picture, and he usually knows the next steps he needs to take, without always waiting for direction and instruction from authority figures. In this way, he exhibits modern leadership traits of self-reliance and strength. His superiors (Ralph Fiennes among them, as the new “M”) learn to give him a certain amount of autonomy, promoting modern teamwork models of self-management and mutual trust.

2 — He’s radically honest. Bond rarely (if ever) feigns friendship. He’s true to his allies, and his opponents know where he stands. He usually gives others the benefit of the doubt, until his trust is compromised. He even sometimes puts himself in vulnerable positions (such as visiting enemy lairs and hangouts) in the hopes of gaining knowledge and forming alliances. He’s cautious, yet open, which often gives him a hidden advantage… and, heightens the drama.

3 — He’s patient. Strategic and contemplative, Bond knows how to wait for the opportune moment. He’s not impulsive — rather, he’s direct and deliberate. He plans, without over-thinking to the point of rumination. Impressive in his own circumspect manner, he also delays/denies his own fun… if he’s pushed to sacrifice it, that is. The opening scene of Spectre is case-in-point: is Bond’s female companion from the festival in Mexico City still waiting for him to return to their hotel room? In a classic comic scene, she asks him where he’s going, he disappears out the window, telling her that he’ll “be right back”… yet, way leads unto way, and it seems there are more important matters at hand.

4 — He knows how to focus. Along with the above point, Bond knows how to be fully engaged in the present moment, without fixating on past and future. This doesn’t mean that he can’t learn from his experiences, yet he doesn’t let them distract him from his goals. In fact, we see any fixation on ghosts from the past revealed as a weakness, which is part of the theme of Spectre. What might haunt him instead becomes an advantage when he learns how to apply his knowledge and focus to the present moment.

5 — He can kick off his shoes and have a good time. Basically, Bond would be a fun date. I’m not certain if he’s much of a conversationalist, yet he seems to appreciate the moments of joy (ahem!) along the way. He can joke around a bit, and he often pauses between the high-stress moments in order to appreciate the finer details. He likes his martinis shaken, not stirred, and he loves the thrill of the ride (after all, it’s all about the journey, right?). Fineries aside, I could certainly imagine Bond appreciating the beauty in a reflective moment… fleeting as it might be.

Yes, while I could point out all of the mindful aspects of his personality and behavior, certainly Bond’s propensity for fisticuffs would discredit him from becoming the mindful poster-boy. Still, for me, it’s compelling to consider that much of the Bond attraction could be due to his cool, calm, collected persona. Developing a life of his own seems to be his next mission… This just might be the ultimate mindful message: in the end, Bond chooses personal love over his agent identity. Could this be his moment of mindful redemption? If so, love really does conquer all.


By Caitlin Krause @MindWise_CK

Caitlin

I recently went tech-free for five days, which doesn’t sound like a huge number, but it had me wondering: could I do it? Could I actually get away from apps, emails and texts for that amount of time? What would the experience be like, and could I, as a mindfulness consultant, use it as some sort of experiment, in order to inform me of my own habits and knee-jerk expectations?

I was both excited and intimidated.

I prepped for the “great unplugged” event, setting up my email auto-response; warning friends and family that I would be out of contact for the five weekdays. It might sound as if I was heading off on some adventure in the wilderness — a trip to Italy for a week was a different sort of exploration. I would have hardly any online time, so the “tech sabbatical” was a necessity. It turned out to be more profound than I could have predicted.

The following are my 10 top observations of effects of living tech-free:

1) Starting Local: There was no checking in the morning and at night; instead, I woke up and stretched in the morning, choosing to meditate or take a walk/run outside. I focused on weather; I listened to my own body. When I check email in the morning, my first thoughts are often connected to the idea of tasks or job; instead, my thoughts while unplugged were about the quality of my natural environment. It seemed to form a good base for the day, to start local.

2) Observe the World: I am usually observant by nature; did this tech-free week heighten my awareness? Not sure — but I can guarantee that my lack of connectivity didn’t dampen my observations. After about a day, I stopped habitually reaching for my phone to check it. Breaking that habit was oddly liberating, and didn’t take very long.

3) Navigate using surroundings: I like that my phone can help me find my way around when I’m in a bind, yet I prefer the feeling of navigating by sight/curiosity, or taking advantage of the directions of the local experts. Of course, there’s time to consider, but operating off-the-grid made me more aware of my own independent skills, resilience, and appreciation of my surroundings. Even with yelp, foursquare, and all other travel apps in consideration, staying tech-free seemed to simplify life, heightening joy.

4) Joy Factor: As mentioned, there is a simple joy in being a part of each moment as it happens. There is no rush be elsewhere… I’m aware that each present moment is all that really exists.

youth-570881_1280

 

5) Humanity: Albert Einstein famously said, “It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity.” This is a concern. Even selfies appear… self-absorbed, by nature. Without my tech dividing me from others, I found my own empathy increasing… I was fully present to engage in smaller exchanges; to be part of the pulse of life. It felt richer, somehow, this experience.

6) Interior Landscape: Without the constant sense of urgency to touch in with social media, I was free to explore the landscape of my thoughts. Some of my own ideas surprised and amused me; it was refreshing, to rediscover the voice inside, away from online chatter. I even went for runs without headphones, and found that my constant use of an iPod while exercising had made me unaccustomed to the sound of my own breath. This elemental re-connection was profound.

7) Offline Presence: A lot is emphasized about establishing an online presence, but what about my offline presence? I became even more aware of my connections and interactions with others in my local community, and I was able to focus more on what was actually happening, without my mind wandering to a list of online connections and plans. My offline presence was enriching, sustaining and fulfilling, and I would venture to guess that I had a better time during this adventure because I was fully present.

8) Time: I estimate that I saved about four to five hours a day, for five days, from cutting out my tech interactions. Incredible. Now, what I do with technology is highly enjoyable and enriching, yet I might justify it as a necessity, which is certainly not the case. I understand there’s a balance to strike, and, while I love certain advantages that technology provides, I greatly value the benefits of this ability to unplug.

9) Love Endures: It occurred to me that friends might wonder or think I didn’t care if I wasn’t posting or texting right back. Not the case; in fact, love is uplifting and supportive by nature, and I don’t need to be in constant contact to remind others of the strength of human bonds.

10) FOMO overshadows reality: Yes, I’m confident that I’m always going to be missing out on something when I’m offline, but I can pick right back up, and the benefits I’m experiencing offline are just as important. The tech world is fast-paced, and you can feel as if you’re outdated if you’re offline for longer than an hour. Still, the benefits of a tech sabbatical speak for themselves, and all of that action-packed online forum will still be in full effect when I want to jump back in. It’s always a choice.

In sum, my tech-free week was not without its high points and hitches, strides and slides (I posted several snaps on Instagram one night, which felt illicitly fun), yet the time offline produced a few overall observations that I find both useful and surprisingly powerful. I’ll certainly opt for it in the future— though, I’m sure I’ll need to refer back to this list again to remind myself of why I’m breaking the habit. It’s well worth it: disconnect to reconnect.