Monthly Archives: June 2015

Have you ever wondered what you are doing there in Shanghai, Pune or Moscow? Is this international assignment really a career step for you or do you feel that the tasks you have are less challenging than in your previous role? Have you felt a bit downgraded even though you might earn more money than ever?

It could be that you are a victim of a corporate strategy that does not really work out the international assignment business case but just sends “talents” abroad to give them “international exposure” or you were sent abroad to fill a gap, to replace a critical key person on a short notice. It was easier to send an assignee than to hire from the local market. Maybe your knowledge, skills and experience also justify that you were selected for the role but still…

You feel you are not working up to your full potential.

Here are five tips how you can improve such a situation:

  • Draft your international assignment business case by showing the business value of your assignment. Show facts and figures about how you can improve sales, research or processes in the new location. Discuss quarterly targets with your host sponsor. Ensure that these are filed and reported back to your home location.
  • Address the issue with your home sponsor on your next home leave. Discuss what you think is lacking for your career development. Make sure that the sponsor sees your development as a responsibility and regularly connect with her or him.
  • Journal your experience as it might be a perception error due to culture shock. Speak with an intercultural career advisor about critical incidents in the host location that give you the feeling that you are “an outsider” or “off track” or “performing badly”.
  • Ensure that your training and development history is updated in your home location regularly and that you keep your profile updated on any skill sites (internally and externally). Update LinkedIn at least every three months.
  • Build your professional network in the host location by attending business networks, industry group events and seminars. You will profit from your connections even when you move to another location.Reizigers 4

When you start your own business you have a lot of roles: You are everyone: From your own PA to the cleaner to the expert and business development manager. You need to learn about marketing, leads, work with new tools and you neglect your personal life. Those of us who thought they will have a better work-life balance when starting their own business either have another source of income or inherited millions from their parents OR they are not making enough money. They might get by but they are not saving for retirement nor do they spend money like employed professionals.

There will be a time however, when either you go bankrupt or you finally see the traction in your business, where you finally feel like all your efforts were worth it and you are suddenly making a lot of money. (For everyone the definition of “a lot of money” is different but in the context of Switzerland I would say if you reach a turnover beyond 100’000 CHF per year that’s already pretty good.)

In the last few years I have been building up a business and believe me there were many occasions when I wanted to give up and get back into a regular employment again. I have a secret to share: I only got this far because a) I had a financial reserve to cover my normal living expenses and b) whenever I had a “crisis” I spoke to a coach.

Most of my business issues were and still are internal issues. Once I “cleaned up” my inner house, I got a chance to work on the inner garden and enjoy the sunshine.  I might still be in this process but I would say that the sun shines a lot more often now.

I feel like a CEO* when:

  1. I am in control of all aspects of my business,
  2. I have a good team behind me that delivers continuous results,
  3. We have a trusted cooperation with our clients and they are happy to come back to us,
  4. I can afford to pay myself a regular salary as the Managing Director, which pays my rent, insurances, bills and groceries.
  5. My diary is rather full but at the same time I have the freedom to block a full day for creative retreats in the mountains or a business strategy meeting in Goa.

What do you do to make yourself feel like a CEO?

Do you have any CEO rituals you’d like to share?

 

Have a powerful week,

 

Angie

 

*PS: In Switzerland the Managing Director of a Ltd. is not called CEO. It would give the wrong impression if I called myself CEO.