Monthly Archives: November 2016

If you read this post you will notice that the conversation we had over the last few weeks about a shift in what “work “ will mean going forward is about to happen. I am generally a bit pessimistic when I look at the world economy and the political arena but I strongly believe in the idea of Europe.

The German economy is strong for example and new jobs in the digital industry but also in areas related to healthcare are created. Cities like Berlin and Hamburg attract a new crowd of globally-minded Europeans. In Zurich, Dubai, Casablanca, Pune and Singapore and other places you see these “hubs” of the globally mobile professionals.

At the moment you might still be working for one company, but within the next ten years you will probably either work for multiple companies, become a freelance consultant or run a charity next to your part-time role.

Don’t forget the economic migrants and refugees who moved away from their home lands either because a lack of opportunities or because they wanted a better future for their children. Many also fled because they do not want an ideology stamped on them that does not match their values and lifestyles.

We all are part of the Global People Club.

 

We are all in the middle of this shift. Retirement is not a goal any more because “artists” will never retire. They get better with age.

What will you contribute to this world?

Yours
Angie

PS: Have you considered career coaching and would you prefer to work in a small group, rather than 1:1?

Here is an offer for you: HireMe! Group Coaching

A German interview by Petra Schuseil with @angieweinberger on “Lebenstempo” (life speed):

https://petraschuseil.wordpress.com/2016/11/24/angie-weinberger-das-lebenstempo-unter-der-lupe

“Winter is coming”

We feel it everywhere. Did you already get your winter tires or are you waiting for the first snow (and the first fine in Switzerland) before you go to the garage. With our programs it is similar. I hear clients that they only came to see me after a year of contemplating whether it is worth the money. Most of the time we take action when it is slightly late or urgent.

Are you pondering about this question as well?

In the past, I hesitated about two essential courses in my life. For my coaching education I waited about three years and saw the advert at least three times before I sent an email to enroll. For “Tribewriters” I dragged the decision for three years as well. There is a mastermind group I am not signing up for yet (only two years of advertising it to me).

In both courses I further developed my skills. Without those courses I would not be intercultural coach and the blogger that I am today. The investment compared to the joy I experience of running my own business has been low.

If you think where all your other earnings go, I’d advise you now to spend at least 10% of your annual income on further education and keeping in the skill business. This was at least in the days of classical learning models.

Online versus Offline

I know, I know…you can learn everything today on KHAN ACADEMY and via MOOCs.

If you are a bit like me you might need the comfort of a class (even if it is a virtual class), a cup of coffee and an old-fashioned spiral book to feel like you are actually learning something.

  • When I listen to a podcast while ironing this is inspiring.
  • When I work on a presentation in Google slides it’s a new tool for me and it is skill building.
  • When I dial in to a webinar on “Theory U”, I take in basics of the book and concept behind it.

Still, if I want to progress on a higher level, I need a class. I need classmates and a structured atmosphere.

Are you looking for structure, pace and a class too?

Join us in January 2017 for the HireMe! Group Coaching.

 

https://globalpeopletransitions.com/hireme-group-coaching/

About three years ago, I published an unfinished book chapter to a circle of clients on Facebook to help one or two people in the group for whom I hoped the chapter would be helpful. What happened next is that I got a message from an old friend. He offered his feedback on the chapter.

I immediately felt discouraged, thought that everything was wrong and wished I had never put the document out there. I had a full horror scenario in my mind. I was about to hit reply “Thank you but the document was already edited professionally. I did not ask you for feedback.”

I was angry and scared.

Then I read the comment again with which I published the document and noticed that I might have solicited the feedback. Was I even fishing for compliments?

Did I not ask people to tell me if they found the chapter helpful?

I muttered that my friend should not have criticized my work. I did not ask him for a proofread. I did not explicitly ask for his feedback. I did not want to have a Skype conversation with him.

Then I remembered my words from a training I recently gave. Most people give feedback and advice without permission. I advise clients to assume positive intentions. I thanked my friend for the offer and pushed the date for the Skype conversation. I wanted to hear his ideas but only when I feel secure, professional and ready. I almost asked him to send the feedback in writing. Then I remembered that he was not paid for it. I remembered that he is in fact a great logical thinker and proofreader and that I might be able to get a perspective that only he can provide. I took the feedback in. It was hard. I finally concluded that I needed to invest a lot more time into the manuscript and then I did not do anything for about 1.5 years. When I was ready to tackle the book, I almost rebuilt it and then I had to have it proofread by a native speaker. Again, I was shattered by the feedback and critique.

The episode with my friend repeated itself about six months ago. I thought I was finally ready to publish “The Global Career Workbook” when my friend asked me why I had not showed my manuscript to him. I did not say anything but sent him the manuscript asking for a review of the logic, structure and if the flow made sense to him. He reviewed two chapters and sent back a line-by-line review. I almost through my laptop out of the window that Monday morning.

I emailed back, asked him to stop working on it and mentioned the editing and that I had not asked for a line-by-line feedback but a general review of the logic and structure of the book. I almost stopped the publication.

What I noticed is that I will never by like my friend and my products will never be like his (paid) work, because I am another person than him and I have other strengths. My English will also never be as smooth as my editors. No, my English will always sound a bit off and I might make mistakes because I am not a native speaker.

Maybe you would not read my newsletter if my friend wrote it, maybe you would hate my writing if it was smooth like my editor’s and maybe you would not be interrupted in your flow if my English was flawless. Maybe you would think I am robot or copywriter and not the Angie you believe you know.

As a solopreneur, you might have phases where your self-confidence is as low as the batteries on my iphone. I have doubts about my quality when I forget to pull the presentation on the laptop before a training, when the laptop does not want to start before the training or when I take a wrong turn and show up late. So far though no major drama ensued. So far, I always find solutions (even without a big armada of support staff behind me). So far, a few readers really work with my workbook.

You need to belief that only you can deliver your services they way you do. Out there in the world there will be companies, clients and customers for your art. You just have to find them or give them a chance to find you.

When I make mistakes or when my final product is not perfect it annoys me. I learnt over the years though that there is a point where you have to let go, where your additional input does not improve your output. Another rule I have learnt is to work with highly skilled professionals. You can’t always be sure that the person you hire to support you is the best in their field but you can test them for a while and see if they meet your standard. If they don’t then you have to move on. You also need to remember that a perfect product will almost never be paid. So if you already spent a day on developing the content of the presentation but you are only paid for delivery stop being a perfectionist and work with what you have.

Have an inspired and wonderful week.
Angie


Guest Post by Valerie Priestley

Moving country and within a country has become a way of life for me. Along the road I learned first how to adapt to the employment market: going from a city to a little province town taught me the importance of researching employment possibilities and thus being able to make an educated decision: Could I only work in a market research consultancy specialized in the construction industry or was I agile enough to embrace a career change?

My next big move forced me to consider my family as a whole and decide what was best for us as a unit. The advantages of opening up to a new culture, mastering a new language, thus giving a huge life advantage to our two daughters, moving forward the career of my husband largely outweighed my newish promotion as a branch manager. This move which started as a bit of a dare soon evolved into a project which had to be led successfully. The integration of 4 people depended on it. The financial aspect came only second to the improvement of quality of life.

Working in the financial sector obviously helped me enormously to fathom out what our financial or taxation situation would be; i.e. no double taxation within the EU. We got help where needed to correctly appreciate the remuneration package that was laid on the table, for example to try and evaluate the cost of living, renting levels (1st item on a family budget),… We both activated our networks to gather as much information as possible before accepting the relocation. The head of HR of a big international company explained the different items they offered their expats. Other expats we got to know gently offered their time to walk us through their integration.  Their experience raised more questions, forced us stop and think about what we expected from the change in our -until then, very rewarding life, to examine what education we wanted to give our daughters, the effect on both our careers.

I took a huge amount of time and effort to get to know  where the schools were, how they operated, how easy it was to travel by public transport, what social life we could have, how the social security system and health insurance work and cost, where to find a GP, health specialist, shops… These every day details have to be taken into account to decide where you would like to settle down. This should not be underestimated: I have witnessed families failing to integrate because of a lack of prior questioning and knowledge.

Relocation agencies, are they worth it? The answer to that question relies not only on the quality of the provided service but also on the allocated budget. Their knowledge of the local market is an undeniable asset. But the last move unveiled yet another reality: some landlords are reluctant or totally against dealing with relocating agencies. So be prepared to have to roll up your sleeves if you want to make sure you live where you evaluated would be the best spot for you. Priority setting is a must: location versus cost of rent for example, this needs to be agreed upon by all involved in decision making.

Choosing a new home could be turned into a great opportunity for younger ones to feel involved in the decision-making process: before making visits our daughters were briefed to take care of certain missions. Each one was to concentrate on assigned rooms, take pictures and make note of what she liked most about it or what would make it hard for her and us to consider living in the property. The debriefing turned into a lively conversation and in the end help towards the success of the relocation.

I took the opportunity of each move abroad to master a new language: without a budget for it at first – I learned on the job. English then became kind of my second mother tongue or family language.  Language courses designed for expats or even better a one on one course should be included in a relocation package as speaking the local language is not only a question of politeness to the locals but also a passport to finding a job specially for the accompanying spouse or partner, a necessity to be understood by your new car mechanic, GP etc.

With the move the honeymoon period of the project finishes, the hard work of making a nest, joining communities starts. Join existing clubs to meet your new best friends.  Truth be told with each day you are given new opportunities to learn something new. I could not live without that challenge.

During this phase, discover and make the most of the new surroundings as you never know how much time you have to enjoy it. Life is full of surprises. No matter how well you planned your career, for example going back to university to retrain and find your dream job – my case, some economic or personal parameter changes and throws a spanner in your well-oiled system – my case !

And it is time to start afresh…new experience, new excitement, new opportunities to learn something…

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Valerie Priestley

Valérie Priestley is an experienced professional with a focus on HR and a background in both financial services and the marketing sector. Her thirst for knowledge and desire to help others grow led her to return to university and successfully gain a Masters in training in 2014. Bilingual French-English she rose to the challenge and now works in German.