Giving Feedback Across Cultures

Dr. Jens Schmidt, A German Executive in Shanghai

Dr. Jens Schmidt is an expat. The company’s corporate headquarters in Stuttgart, Germany, assigned him  to improve efficiency at the company’s manufacturing plant in Shangai, China. During his first 90 days he came up with a list of quality issues and he shared this list with three of his direct reports (Mr. Zhu, Mr. Cao and Mrs. Ping). 

He asked them for input on how to mitigate the issues within the next 90 days and what the “low hanging fruit” were. He emailed them on Friday evening and asked them to respond by Monday morning, enough time to review over the weekend. While Dr. Jens Schmidt was sorting out his moving goods that finally arrived from Stuttgart and settled into his apartment, Mr. Zhu, Mr. Cao and Mrs. Ping went for lunch. They did not appreciate that they had to leave their families on the weekend but they knew this was important. On Sunday night Mr. Cao, the most senior, eldest and most experienced manager responded to the email.

“Dear Dr. Schmidt, thank you for the trust you are giving to your senior managers by sharing this report with us before sending it to the headquarters. We are fully on board with you and we think you and the quality assurance team in the headquarters will give good guidance on how to mitigate the issues presented in the report. We kindly ask that you inform us of any changes once you have discussed this report with the headquarters. With kind regards, Mr. Cao”.

On Monday, when Dr. Schmidt came back to the office, Mr. Zhu handed in his resignation. Two weeks later Mr. Cao and Mrs. Ping also resigned.

Now, Dr. Schmidt had to lead 50 engineers directly. He was using everything he knew that worked in Germany — especially in terms of performance appraisal, and yet the Chinese employees seemed to be losing efficiency and effectiveness by the week. After 90 days, many engineers had moved to other companies and Dr. Schmidt had a hard time to explain to HR why he needed to hire new engineers and managers in the middle of a global crisis. His 180 days report looked bleak. The quality issues had become worse and Dr. Schmidt had nothing to show for but failure.

It took quite some time and effort on Dr. Schmidt’s part to recognize that what worked in Germany in terms of critical and to-the-point feedback was actually demotivating to the Chinese employees, who were used to more positive reinforcement than pure critique. These positive comments motivated them to increase productivity and put forth that extra, discretionary effort. Once Dr. Schmidt changed his feedback and his communication style in general he noticed that productivity improved again. He was also able to win the managers and some of the employees back once he understood the importance of relationships and the concept of “face” in the Chinese culture.

Three years later he managed to leave the country with a good feeling. 

Feedback is Completely Misconstrued

According to the original mechanistic definition feedback occurs when an environment reacts to an action or behavior. For example, ‘customer feedback’ is the buyer’s reaction to a firm’s products and policies, and ‘operational feedback’ is the internally generated information on a firm’s performance. 

Originally, the idea was that feedback changes behavior. Criticism or praise is considered  feedback only if it brings about a lasting change in the recipient’s behavior. While I am generally critical of this assumption, I would like to explain here three major feedback styles that I have seen over my career. Often they work in a monocultural setting or when they are framed well. For example, critiques work well for writers and bloggers, the sandwich works well in an Anglo-Saxon environment and Hindi-style generally works well in Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

One major issue is that feedback often is NOT delivered well. Another issue is that often it is full of projections and that it has to be abused to justify why a good performer was not promoted. That is one of the key issues with feedback. For the next three styles we will assume that the feedback is well delivered, the feedback receiver asked for feedback and the feedback is not used as a justification for non-promotion or a performance rating.

German-Style: Pure Direct Critique

The German Style
The German Style

Clearly, people in Germany do not generally provide and receive feedback in the same way that people in China are used to doing. In fact, appraisal feedback can be very different across different cultures. Although not many like to do it, we know that critiquing – in a constructive and empowering way – others’ work is a crucial part of a manager’s job. However, critiquing someone often brings unwanted results and ends up hurting others even when this wasn’t the initial goal. This generally happens because criticism embodies two of the things that human beings hate the most, i.e. it calls for submission and it devalues. 

With a focus on what needs to be improved, this method works extremely well for writers, bloggers and co-creators. In many instances, authors actually request it. It’s also often used in educational circumstances, training contexts and examinations. Here it is important to focus on the work, instead of the person. For example, “In this report, capitalization is not applied consistently.” or “This paragraph is hard to understand because it contains a lot of passive constructions.” Germans love “Sachlichkeit” so the focus here is on the object, the piece of art, the work output, rather than the person delivering the work. The intention here is to improve the overall quality of the work output.

US-Style: The Sandwich Feedback

The original sandwich feedback technique entails something positive to warm up the discussion, followed by some criticism which is the real feedback one wants to give, and it wraps up with more praise, i.e. again something positive to soften the actual feedback. In other words, the sandwich feedback method involves discussing corrective feedback that is “sandwiched” between two layers of praise.

There are two ways to put the sandwich feedback technique in practice: 

  1. You start off with a positive comment, add constructive feedback with an explanation of how to improve, and end with another positive comment. 
  2. You begin with a contextual statement (I liked…because…Now/Next time…) and conclude with an interactive statement, e.g. a question based on the work done.
The Sandwich Feedback Model
The Sandwich Feedback Model

This method is particularly helpful to managers when they want to discuss problems with the employee’s behavior. It is especially useful for those managers who find it difficult to deliver corrective feedback. It is important to note that you need to ask for permission to give feedback and also find examples of where you observe what you find worth changing. Here you should focus on behavior, rather than the person and soften it with “tend to” and “I observed” and “what this does with me…”. Speak about how it affects you. This approach takes the name of Non-Violent Communication (NVC) and it was developed by the  American psychologist M. Rosenberg.

Hindi-Style: Focus on the Positive

Thumb Up
The Hindi Style Feedback

In Bangalore, I learned another feedback style which I call “Hindi-Style Feedback”. Basically, here you focus on the positive and remain silent on the negative. In order to save face you don’t confront the person you are addressing directly. If you have negative feedback you would tell this to an intermediary who then decides about how to approach the topic with the person.

This method works well in the Asian context or when you generally already have a high-performing team and nothing major goes wrong. Focussing and reinforcing the strengths and the positive behavior will lift employees up and encourage them to do more of this behavior. Also, I think it is important to build a personal relationship before delivering feedback and better to deliver it 1:1. If you are only correcting errors and you have agreed a more direct style to do that it is acceptable if you have a good relationship with your team members.

In the SIETAR conference in Dublin in a pre-congress workshop my colleague Adrienne Rubatos and I co-created a feedback map with the participants.

The Feedback Map
The Feedback Map (Rubatos, Weinberger, 2017)

We also suggested that feedback usually creates more harm than support and as humanistic coaches we therefore would propose to stop using performance management systems, Management by Objectives and certainly feedback. Where we feel feedback is helpful ONLY would be in learning situations, transitions and when it is explicitly demanded by the feedback-receiver.

I’m aware that this is a complete paradigm shift and that it will change our approaches to promotions, compensation, benefits, hierarchy and basically completely turn around how we work in organizations.

We are demanding a new approach to feedback. We promote an approach that is mindful, supportive and transcultural. 

Delivering Feedback like a Global Virtual Leader

Even if in a new cultural setting it’s useful to learn the cultural rules, perhaps through a cultural mentor, don’t assume that “going native” is always and necessarily successful. Most of the time, you will have to adjust your feedback style and create a blend with which you feel comfortable enough in the given setting and with the person you have in front of you. 

More and more often teams are global virtual teams (GVT) and there are no rules other than the rules the teams co-create.  We have vast experience working within global, virtual teams and you find further blog posts via https://globalpeopletransitions.com/?s=global+virtual+teams.

Alternatively, you can join our RockMe! program or the RockMeRetreat where we discuss these matters based on your leadership challenges.

Instant Feedback Just Doesn’t Work. It’s Time to Evolve.

As our workplaces rapidly embrace international professionals and multiculturalism and become more diverse, an interesting development has come to light that I feel needs to be addressed at the earliest: the process of feedback in an intercultural context and how to tackle its many flaws.

These days there is this idea made common in several industries, particularly the tech sector, that abrasive, instant feedback is a way to stop beating about the bush and giving it straight to the recipient, sometimes even in public spaces. The idea being that the pressure created by the ‘tough love’ will motivate employees into bringing out their best, something that even Hollywood has glamorized with films like The Devil Wears Prada.

The reality is that there are issues with providing instant feedback, the most frequent one being that you fail to realize if the issue you are raising is concerning a person’s individual personality, or a cultural trait or was purely situational.

The second common issue is that feedback works differently in different cultures. Basically, your attempt at it may not even register, or come across in a negative manner. Americans, for instance, generally pepper in several positive comments before raising a negative one, while most Europeans are straightforward and critical about the whole thing. In a lot of Asian countries, feedback is discussed implicitly, and only provided in private settings and not in the public workspace. Do you see now how instant feedback could be misconstrued in an intercultural context? In fact, a lot of the latest discussions talk about ending the ‘traditional’ concept of feedback altogether, as it has shown time and again to not help improve performance. You can read about it here.

An important bit from the last paragraph was how feedback was culturally handled in Asian countries, in a one-on-one setting. It is actually now considered a preferable alternative to traditional feedback sheets. Combining that with the continuous feedback style is key to fostering a better relationship between employee and manager. It boosts the turnover rate for improvement as managers no longer have to wait for an arbitrary amount of time to discuss and motivate an employee, then wait another arbitrary amount of time before iterating on that previous session. Any undesirable behaviour or poor performance is not given time to grow as it could evolve into something worse.

One-on-one meetings further help this regular improvement along – these sessions allow for a more candid and diverse discussion that isn’t restricted to whatever rubric was set up on a feedback form. Combined, these two techniques can help managers bring out the best in their employees and build a more positive and constructive feedback cycle that is morale and productivity boosting. It is essential that this entire process be made a conversation, a two-way interaction rather than a session where a manager shares their rating of their employee’s skills. This is especially important as recent research and studies are showing what has been a constant point of discussion: that human beings are incapable of reliably rating themselves or other humans. You can read the thorough breakdown over at the Harvard Business Review, who make a strong case against the current practices of ‘feedback culture’.

Finally, I’d like to build on the concept of feedback but in a slightly tangential way: the idea behind ratings. Specifically, students rating their lecturers or teachers. Ratings have become an integral part of modern culture, we rate everything from food to places to car rides to memes. However, the entire concept is highly reductive and strips context and depth from any situation. For instance, giving an Uber driver driving dangerously a 1-star is not enough of a response, while a 1-star for a shoddy car will not fix whatever was broken in the vehicle. These rating systems are gamifying a complex thing and are fundamentally broken.

Coming back to students rating lecturers, I’m sure you can now easily spot the possibilities of exploiting the system to the detriment of the lecturer. Is a lecturer bad because he gave your essay a poor grade? Does that one poor grade negate an entire teaching period’s efforts? And is the student able to rate the knowledge areas she doesn’t even know existed?

All that nuance is lost when reduced to a rating system. Additionally, most lecturers are working in a gig-based economy, just like those Uber drivers, and they are at the mercy of these broken ratings system. So often those who entertain and let you pass easily will receive good feedback but those who challenge you and make you work harder will get negative feedback. And where do you think you learned more?

Given that we don’t know what we don’t know and our multi-facetted intercultural contexts, don’t you think feedback is overrated and an outdated concept?

Unless there’s an extenuating circumstance, don’t dignify these ratings systems by assuming they’re real feedback.

Let’s work towards reworking the ratings and feedback biases that drive so many of modern workplaces.

In our RockMeRetreat you will learn more about our bias in decision making and how we are less rational than we would like to think.

You will also learn methods that are more effective in helping yourself and others grow to your full potential.

Pre-Conference Workshop, 22 and 23 May 2017 in Dublin: Feedback and its Alternatives – an Exploration for Global, Mindful People –

Feedback can be a blessing or a curse, depending on the context and the type of feedback. This experiential workshop takes us on a journey to examine giving and receiving feedback and to explore alternatives to traditional feedback exchanges.

Feedback and its Alternatives – an Exploration for Global, Mindful People

An explorative workshop with Adrienne Rubatos and Angie Weinberger applying concepts and tools based on the Vermeulen-Analysis-Model and the Vermeulen & Kinast coaching school.

An essential concern of this workshop is to deconstruct feedback in general, but especially the traditional Western approach of “giving feedback”, which still dominates the business world. Global folks are demanding a new approach to feedback, an approach that is mindful, supportive and transcultural.

The workshop will seek to support you in developing these new feedback styles.

Both facilitators have experienced constructive and destructive feedback, in the context of corporate, author or coaching roles directly with herself or with her clients. Indeed this was the starting point for deepening knowledge on the topic and for experimenting with new feedback forms.

Researching among global peers, general uncertainty in recommending suitable forms of feedback, especially between high and low context cultures can be observed. Surprisingly even in Western countries, traditionally known for directness, a new openness towards more creative, collaborative and non-hierarchal feedback styles is growing. Such feedback treated with reflection and mindfulness on both sides of the feedback process can lead to personal and professional growth.

The workshop invites participants to explore the concept of “mindful feedback” further.

Beside rich content, sharing of experiences among the participants and collective exploration of the topic, participants will also benefit from exploring alternative, less known methods: body learning, relationship explorations, dyads, meditation elements, sensing, metaphors, dancing, drawing, and spiritual wisdom. These interventions generally help to build self-awareness, self-confidence and a strong personal and leadership presence even in complex environments, like global teams.

The facilitators practice these in their everyday personal and professional lives. Most of them originate in the Vermeulen-Analysis-Model and the coaching school around it, which certified a limited number of coaches only.

We invite participants of low and high context cultures, both senior and junior professionals 

  • who want to deepen and widen his/her use of feedback and its alternatives
  • who want to enrich his/her coaching or training methods
  • who practice self-support and peer coaching
  • who want to sharpen his/herself-awareness through body work and mindful practices
  • who are open to exchange, experiment and learn in a collaborative style.

The workshop has multiple goals:

At a personal level

  • to review our past and create new personal experiences around feedback situations
  • to develop ourselves by learning new methods of collaboration, reflection, inquiry, self-coaching and deep-preparation for feedback situations

At the content level

  • to tackle, in a new depth and width, the components of, and the conditions necessary for, feedback
  • to look at methods and models to transform feedback, or even the wisdom to replace it

At the business application level

  • how we can learn to react, treat or receive feedback from our clients in a self-respecting way
  • to develop intercultural feedback styles for our clients, that they can apply to team members of various cultural backgrounds
  • to incorporate suitable technology designs, media and tools to receive messages from the clients (e.g. personal debriefing, social media, wish lists to the manager, feedback wall…)

Registration and Fee

This is a pre-conference workshop to the SIETAR Congress Dublin, 25 to 27 Mai 2017

www.sietareu.org/the-congress/pre-congress-workshops

Early Early Bird Fee until 28 Feb 2017 is EUR 390 (incl. 23% VAT).

The number of workshop participants is limited. First-come, first-served.

If you have any questions please contact us via adrienne.rubatos@t-online.de and angela.weinberger@globalpeopletransitions.com

Registration here.

Your facilitators


Adrienne Rubatos

Intercultural Consultant, Trainer and Executive Coach

Adrienne Rubatos is a senior change management and intercultural consultant, trainer and coach specialized on cooperation between East and West in Europe. She accompanies mainly multinationals in their complex international programs. Before, she gathered 16 years of industry and management experience, which took her around the globe. She holds a Master in Electrical-Engineering and an Executive-MBA degree, as well as various certifications in coaching, consulting and intercultural studies. She enjoys travels and languages, speaking six of them. Adrienne is an associate professor of IBR (global MBA program in Africa, Eastern-Europe, India, Israel) within Steinbeis University Berlin since twelve years, teaching currently HR. She is the author of diversophy®Romania, the book “Beruflich in Rumänien”, numerous articles and SIETAR conference papers. She descends from Transylvania, lives in Germany and works globally. Her growing passion is both meta-perspectives and small mindful and embodiment practices included to her work and life.

Angie Weinberger

Angie Weinberger

Global Career Advisor, Executive Coach and Global Mobility Expert

Angie Weinberger, who graduated in International Business Studies, lived and worked in Germany, the UK, India and Australia before moving to Zurich in 2009. She has worked in HR and Global Mobility in large global corporates like Winterthur, Deutsche Bank, PwC, LafargeHolcim for 20 years. She founded Global People Transitions offering intercultural executive and career coaching to internationally mobile professionals through programs such as HireMe! and RockMe! both for corporate and private clients. Angie has a systemic consultancy background and is a certified professional intercultural coach (B.Vermeulen & Dr.E. Kinast) with a focus on relationship building, mindfulness and body awareness. She is a founding and active Board member of SIETAR Switzerland and volunteers in a variety of social projects. She published various books, recently “The Global Career Workbook” – a self-help job search guide for internationally mobile professionals. She learns Arabic and loves Bollywood Dancing.

The ugly Truth about Feedback

►Shipping unfinished work

Artists are never satisfied with their work.
Feedback…not always easy to take.

Recently I published a book chapter to a circle of clients before official publication mainly to help one or two people in the group for whom I thought it could be helpful. What happened next is that I got a message from an old friend. He offered his feedback on the chapter.

I immediately felt discouraged, knew that everything was wrong and wished I had never put the document out there. I quickly skimmed through the document. “What has he found? Structure, spelling, grammar, meaningless content, wrong entry into the topic…” I had the full horror scenario in my mind. I was about to hit reply “Thank you but the document was already edited professionally. I did not ask for feedback.” I was angry and emotional.

Then I read the comment again with which I published the document and noticed that I might have solicited the feedback. Was I even fishing for compliments? Did I not ask people to tell me if they found the chapter helpful?

I muttered that my friend should not have given me feedback on my work. I did not ask him for a proofread. I did not want to have a Skype conversation with him.

Then I remembered my words from a training I recently gave. Most people give feedback and advice without permission. I advise clients to assume positive intentions. I thanked my friend for the offer and pushed the date for the Skype conversation. I wanted to hear his ideas but only when I feel secure, professional and ready. I almost asked him to send the feedback in writing. Then I remembered that he was not paid for it. I remembered that he is in fact a great logical thinker and proofreader and that I might be able to get a perspective that only he can provide.

►Ignoring critical feedback or waiting until you are ready

Being ready for critical feedback is the key. I am a sensitive person. I have a very high standard for my work. I do not like criticism. I only like appreciation. I do not like to read seminar feedbacks. Even if the feedback is positive I “hear” the negative feedback more. Most of it is positive and constructive. I get great advice from clients and seminar participants.

However, my own insecurities get in my way.

Recently I heard a podcast. One very successful writer said he never reads reviews from readers because all that does is asking for permission. He says, that critical reviews often gives you a reason to procrastinate. It is one of the most common reasons not to ship your work. As an artist or writer it is essential though that you ship. You have to publish in order to be heard and in order for your products to be recognized as your work.

It’s one reason why I keep postponing the publication of my workbook for Global Mobility Professionals. I am genuinely worried that the content is not good enough.

I already procrastinated the reviews for months. The feedback I received is generally positive and appreciative. The suggestions for improvement were helping me to put a better structure to my work. Writing a book is humbling already but self-publishing a book gets me close to wanting to live in a psychiatric clinic (i.e. it drives me nuts). As a publisher you have to consider everything from layout to editing to the right pricing.

►Maybe it is time to let go of an old belief

In  order to make progress I needed to hear what my friend had to say. So, a few weeks later we finally had a call. I tried to keep calm and professional but I also told him that I was quite anxious about what he had to say. At the end of the call I seem to have looked shattered and tired. It was tough to listen. I knew I could do better. I knew I had to improve the work but I felt sincerely demotivated.

►Taking the lessons from feedback

The feedback actually was helpful but it also reinforced my belief that nothing I will ever do will be good enough for the world to see. I will always find a flaw or a chapter that could be written better. Also it is a lot easier to use a handout in a coaching session and give a lot of background information orally than it is to write a workbook where all the instruction should be self-explanatory. Keeping a reader engaged in self-study in our current times of constant distraction is near to impossible. I believe I will go back to classroom training. I want to be old-fashioned about everything I do. I want to stay in my comfort zone.

Assuming positive intentions...
Assuming positive intentions…

►Feeling the fear, staying humble and doing it anyway

As I am writing this I am one month away from publishing the workbook without the help of a big publishing company. While I feel that we did well there is still a doubt about the project. But then I read an article about how great artists were and are never happy with their work. Some were even poor during their lifetime. I guess it’s the way it is with art.

 

Does this resonate with you? Are you procrastinating to show your art out of fear of failure? Tell us about it in the comments.

The Social Media Newbie Part 3

From The Facebook to Facebook to Meta

Facebook has changed considerably since we initially logged in in 2008. Back then, Facebook was still called “The Facebook.” Facebook has advanced dangerously fast since then, and it’ll continue to adapt and improve at a quick speed however long it exists. Multiple updates and new features are rolling out regularly, but the core concept and workings have not changed essentially. It’s a place where you can connect and network. Being an expat, you can find like minded people and even make friends via Facebook groups.

It is now going to turn into a metaverse wherein we can interact in virtual worlds focused on social connections. Metaverse is however still in its introductory phase so we will see if it will be able to replace Facebook in the near future. 

What is Facebook
Facebook is a social media network that interfaces individuals through an online platform. By sharing content like messages, status, posts, images, videos, and outside joins like blog entries, Facebook clients can contribute thoughts and discuss with others who share something similar or various interests. As well as sharing their thoughts, clients can draw in with the content others share on Facebook by responding to it with a like, a laugh, anger, surprise, and care reaction. Facebook is a great tool to gather feedback on your product/service and also to promote special offers to your target audience.

Organizations can utilize their Facebook Pages to stay in contact with their customers, target new ones, and offer direct customer support. To completely comprehend Facebook and how it functions, you’ll need to get comfortable with common terms utilized on the platform. Here is a rundown of key Facebook terms and what they mean.

What is Facebook Business
A Facebook Business or Facebook Page is open to all public accounts from Facebook that brands can set up based on their own theme and branding. It may also be used as a social page for Public Figures, artists, and people alike. These pages or Business accounts allow users to share contact information, post updates, share content, promote events and releases, and stay linked with their audience.
These pages can easily be integrated with profiles and Facebook shops to offer a broader package for businesses.

Create a Business Page

Before you can sign up for your Facebook Business Page, you have to log into your own Facebook account. You don’t need to worry: the data from your personal account won’t become public on your business page.

This is a relevant question because business pages often have more than one-page manager. The moderators are individuals with each their own individual Facebook accounts. Your personal account works like the way to give you access to your new business page. If you have partners assisting you with your business page, their own accounts will have equal access to the business as an admin account.

Along these lines, in case you’re not currently logged into your own account, log in now; otherwise, click on Sign Up to get started.

Setup Your Personal Account

To sign up for a Facebook account, follow these three easy steps.

  1. First name
  2. Last name
  3. Mobile number or email
  4. New password
  5. Birthday
  6. Gender.

Click Sign Up.

After you’ve signed up for a Facebook account, you can adjust your privacy settings to control who can see your profile and information. Follow these four simple steps to change your privacy settings.

  1. Click the arrow (downward-pointing blue triangle) on the top right corner of any Facebook page.
  2. Click Settings.
  3. Select Privacy from the sidebar.
  4. Set who is allowed to see your posts and how people can contact you.

Set Up a Business Page

To create a page for your business, follow these steps.

Visit the Facebook website and Open your Facebook profile.

Basic Setup:

  1. At the top of the homepage, select Create and choose Page.
  2. Name your page, and make sure to spell your business name out correctly.
  3. Add a category to describe your pages, such as a marketing agency or restaurant.
  4. Enter business information, such as address and contact information; the more detailed, the better!
  5. Select Continue.

Page Setup:

  1. You can add a profile photo to your page, then add a photo or business logo and click next.
  2. You can add a cover photo to your page. Similarly, add a cover or banner and click next.
  3. You may skip either of the pictures if you desire.
  4. Select Next to go to your new page when you have completed the steps.

Extra Setup:

  1. Link your website.
  2. Add a bio or about section for your business.
  3. Add as many helpful images as possible (menus for restaurants).
  4. Connect to Whatsapp Business (if any).
  5. Connect to Instagram Account (if any).
  6. Vanity URL (create a username in settings).
  7. Add business details (working hours, location, holiday timings, etc.).

Now Post! Ready, Set, Post!


The primary motivation behind Facebook is to help friends and family interface with one another. You can stay on top of your contacts’ minds by refreshing your status once in a while. To share a Facebook status, go to the text box at the highest point of your news feed page or on your profile page.



Types of posts:

  1. Feeling/Activity/Update
  2. Check In
  3. Tag Friends/Followers
  4. Tag Event
  5. Ask for Recommendations
  6. Poll
  7. Support Nonprofit
  8. Answer a Question
  9. Lists
  10. Facebook Stories

Open and Facilitate a Group


The Groups page on Facebook will show you which groups you oversee and those you are a member of. Likewise, you can find groups to join depending on Facebook’s ideas and a huge load of different factors.

To get to the Groups page, tap the Home button, and afterward, on the left sidebar, you’ll see the Explore segment, where you can click Groups.

Facebook Groups address an organic chance to contact many individuals keen on particular themes, yet without paying for ads. Joining and presenting on a pertinent Group as your Facebook Page helps individuals interested in your posts navigate your business page rather than your own profile. 

This feature gives Facebook a major advantage over Linkedin and is a great way of building community.


Page Insights


The more data you have about your audience, the more targeted your content becomes and the better you can fulfill their necessities.

Facebook Page Insights makes it simple to assemble information regarding how your fans communicate with your Page and the content you share. To get to Page Insights, click Insights in the Manage Page menu.

Insights give you data about your Page’s general execution, remembering a few information for audience demographics and engagement. You can see measurements on your posts so you can see the number of individuals you’re coming to.

You’ll likewise perceive the number of remarks and responses are acquired from explicit posts-information that assists you with arranging future content.

Connect and Like Other Pages


Since Facebook is, all things considered, a social media platform-based organization, it’s really smart to involve your Page to construct a community for your business.

One method for building a community is to associate with other pages pertinent to your business (but not competitors).

For instance, assuming that you run a shop in a famous shopping region or shopping center, you could interface with different shops in your area. For example, consider this an internet-based adaptation of your neighborhood business improvement affiliation or office of trade.

Assuming you have a virtual business, you could associate with different companies in your industry that could offer extra benefits for your customers without contending with your offerings.

Look Into These Useful Features

  1. Events:
    The Events page on Facebook will show you any forthcoming occasions popular with your Facebook friends or have been set up by the groups you take part in. Likewise, you can observe events dependent on their date, area, and class.
  2. Marketplace:
    Facebook competes with Netflix in the streaming business; they also rival eBay in the commercial industry. With Facebook Marketplace, you can peruse for a wide range of items, join groups to trade items with individuals in your space or who share comparative interests, search for items sold from various shops, shop by category, and sell your own items.
  3. Pinned Posts:
    Is there important data you need all guests to your Page to see? An advancement you don’t want them to miss? A top-performing piece of content you need to flaunt? Put it in a pinned post.

A pinned post sits at the highest point of your Facebook Business Page, right under your cover picture. It’s an incredible spot to put something eye-catching that will attract your guests and make them want to stay close by.

About the Author 

Nabeha Latif is a Digital Media/Branding Consultant specializing in leveraging online marketing channels to achieve desired goals. Since her majors in digital marketing, she has collaborated with names like UN, Ali Baba Inc, Uber, UNESCO, UNDP, etc., to name just a few. She is also actively involved in providing business development services related to marketing.

NABEHA LATIF
Social Media Consultant