Tag Archives: Global Businesses

Guest Post by Nabeha Latif, Social Media Guru

About YouTube

If you’ve got all your social media covered, why leave out YouTube? If you haven’t gotten around to capitalising on the video platform’s huge audience, now is better than ever! When it comes to numbers, YouTube is hitting it out of the park! With around 500 hours worth of video content uploaded every minute no wonder it ranks No. 2 for global and domestic web traffic globally.

The current era of media consumption and content consumption, whether its education, entertainment or news updates, YouTube has a vast variety for it all. With the whole social trend gradually moving towards video based content on almost all platforms, YouTube is in the spotlight. Surely you’re familiar with the homepage for your own video consumption on the site, however there’s a lot more that goes into a video from the backend to market and get your content out to the right audience. Here’s all you need to know to get your business running on YouTube.

YouTube for business

Although you can view videos without having to sign in, but for uploading and interacting, as with any other site, you’ll need to sign-up/register your Company/Business to get started. Here’s the quick rundown of the process.

  • Sign-Up with your Business: If you use Gmail for your business email, you’ll use the same username and password for your YouTube account that you use for Gmail. Alternatively, you can create a new Google account that you use solely for YouTube business purposes.
  • Enter the Homepage: Here you can double check if you’re in the company account or your personal one.
  • Open your profile (click on the avatar): You’ll find this in the top right corner. It’s a small circle containing your picture, logo or a default letter.
  • Select your channel: Click your avatar and select the channel from the dropdown menu.
  • Select Business or Other name: You’ll need to select this option to get started with a business YouTube account. You can then enter your company’s name.
  • And click create: Done! That’s all you needed to do.

Once completed, head back to your homepage to get on with the setup. On the top left you’ll see three thin lines, which drop down a menu when clicked. This contains a host of options such as homepage, trending videos, your library and your subscriptions.

On the other side, on the top right, you have a lot more going on. You’ll see four buttons, a camera that lets you upload your next video, a set of mini squares that open up YouTube apps, a bubble shaped icon for messages and a bell icon for all your account notifications. The account photo or avatar as mentioned will guide you to your account information and settings.

Channel Customization

That’s all the basic setup you need to start pushing out videos, but not necessarily the best way it can be done! Make your channel, your very own by customising according to your brand theme to get the most out of your content and brand image.

Here are a few things you’ll need to shine the creative light on:

  • Channel Art: Channel art mainly refers to the top banner, similar to that of Facebook and Twitter. A solid place to add a quick tagline and logo for your brand. And on the topic of similarities between Facebook and Twitter, the YouTube icon is similar to that of a profile picture, so uploading your logo is the best bet!

    Here are the dimensions for both:
    Banner: 2560 x 1440 pixels (For mobile devices and a safer bet 1546 x 423 pixels)
    Icon: 800 x 800 pixels (displays as 98 x 98)
  • Business Info: It’s essential to share data about your business, its offerings, etc. You can do this in the About segment of your YouTube account while adding your website along with your company’s slogan.

Begin with your About segment’s channel description. Keep it short and sweet: You simply need a compact statement of purpose with all things considered three links and a minor source of inspiration. Then, at that point, look down to the “email for business requests” box and put the fitting email address there.

In the last segment, you can add anything links you need: your business website, your other online media pages, and some other web pages to which you need to coordinate your watchers. The more links you have, the higher your possibilities directing people to your business website and drawing in your YouTube watchers. The maximum is 30!

  • Channel Trailer: While optional, a channel trailer is a brief video that introduces viewers to the content they’ll find on your YouTube channel. It is an excellent customization option to increase YouTube viewer engagement. Once you add this trailer, it will appear on your account’s homepage when viewers visit, helping to reel them in and acquaint them with your brand.
  • Engaging with users

After all YouTube is a social platform so its best to keep updated on your content consumers, here are the options you can choose from:

  • Comments: You can boost your video’s engagement traffic by responding to users who comment on your videos.You can sort them by newest/oldest or most popular.
  • Likes: Optional to showcase on your channel, but a more public and passive form of response from the audience.
  • Subscriptions: To help get your content out to the users so they stay up to date. Every time you upload a new video, your subscribers receive a push notification. You should constantly encourage viewers to subscribe to your channel, as it improves your engagement traffic and increases the number of views.
  • Sharing: The site’s social widget allows users to share videos on other social media networks, such as Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, Blogger, Reddit, Tumblr, Pinterest and LinkedIn.
  • Messages: Respond to your friends and queries, You can also share private videos and messages with friends and contacts on YouTube.
  • Playlists: You can organize related content together using the site’s playlist feature. This is another way to organize your own content on your channel and help users watch content of a similar type in an easy click.
  • Verification

Let your audience know your channel is the real deal from the sea of accounts and users. Much like other platforms, you’ll see a small checkbox, which indicates a verification badge next to the channel’s name. To apply for verification, your channel must have 100,000 subscribers. However contacting Google if you’re a business helps them verify its you before the milestone requirement.

Going Live!

All social platforms like Facebook and Instagram have the option to stream live content to talk to or just showcase a trailer for example. Similarly, YouTube works all the same. Your account does need to be verified for live videos on YouTube though.

Once your account is ready, then going live has 4 ways on YouTube.The first, which is the quickest, is the Stream Now option. The second is through the Events tab, which gives you more control, because you can preview your stream ahead of time. The third option is found on the site’s mobile app; if you use this, the stream will later be archived on your channel. Lastly, you can stream from your computer’s webcam. 

Trending Content/Videos

Certain content on the rise? Perhaps a new type of challenge, maybe even a meme or even a worldwide breaking news! So hop on the bandwagon to get your content out to popular searches being looked for globally. YouTube users are interacting with at very high rates. Often, these videos were uploaded within the last couple days. You can view the current trending videos under the Trending tab on the YouTube homepage even if you’re not logged in or don’t have an account.

For brands, the goal of creating trending content isn’t necessary. It could be a shoot-for-the-stars goal, because if one of your videos goes viral, it could end up on the trending page and thus create significant exposure for your company. Trending videos on YouTube are the videos currently getting the most engagement. Going viral is a nice goal, but not necessarily the ultimate marker of success, depending on your channel’s audience and tone.

Influencers/Youtubers

Famous people and channels which gain a substantial amount of traction and views with each upload, mostly and primarily found pushing video content out on the platform. With each market and genre, you’ll have a host of content creators for the big, the small and even very particular hybrid niches!

Many YouTubers have corporate sponsorships. These sponsors send YouTubers their products to mention or use in their videos. Often, YouTubers will verbally mention the sponsor company and how awesome its product is.

Connecting with influencers to establish partnership deals can elevate your brand on YouTube, helping you reach more viewers and legitimizing your channel.

Advertising

And now we come to a more direct form of content marketing, advertising your videos out to your desired audience to grab and hook them to your channel! Although most YouTubers and channels have gained success from the free atmosphere of the platform, companies and organizations can get their ads in! Since the site is based on video content, companies are encouraged to add a call-to-action link directing viewers to their website following the video.

There are 4 options when it comes to YouTube ads and placements:

  1. In-stream ads, which play before, during or after other videos which can be skipped after 5 seconds. You’ll be charged when 30 seconds of the video is watched.
  2. Discovery ads, which appear when a user is searching or browsing content on YouTube or across the web. This content has no limit! You’ll be charged based on clicks.
  3. Bumper ads are six seconds or less, and users can’t skip these. Ads like these can appear throughout the video. You’ll be charged for these ads based on cost per thousand impressions, or vCPM.
  4. Paid advertisements on YouTube can help you monetize your video content by giving your audience an easy way to buy your products and services.

YouTube Premium

YouTube Premium or previously called YouTube Red, is a paid subscription version of YouTube, which starts from $11.99 ($12 realistically). This allows for a seamless experience with extra perks such as no ads whatsoever and the ability to download videos for offline play.

Also remember that videos are ad-free with this subscription. At the end of the day, though, YouTube Premium could hurt your business, because the premium services take users away from in-stream advertisements.

Tips

Now that you’re familiar with YouTube and how you can promote your business, here are a few extra tips to keep you above the crowd:

  • Ask and motivate your users to subscribe to your channel, no harm in asking (nicely)!
  • Get the traffic from other platforms onto your video, by sharing it with more of the crowd.
  • Use of keywords, hashtags and trending phrases to stand out with SEO.
  • Get social and mingle with similar content creators to learn and also attract more relevant people!
  • Make custom playlists for your channel, especially if you have a series going.
  • Regular and timely uploads!
  • Use links to more of your content, and links within your videos.
  • Work with trending and high profile YouTubers for product placements, reviews and collabs.
  • YouTube really is inspired from other platforms, so get onto YouTube stories as well.
  • To get the crowd going, how about arranging a giveaway or a contest to get the “hype train” going.

Thank you for sharing this Tulip Anderson and https://websitesetup.org/start-a-blog/

Detailed Infographic How To Start A Business Blog

If you want to read more and get other tips on how to create a well developed business blog, click here

And if you want to find out how to select an appropriate web host before you embark on your online business venture, take a look at this link.

 

Dr. Jens Schmidt, A German Executive in Shanghai

Dr. Jens Schmidt is an expat. The company’s corporate headquarters in Stuttgart, Germany, assigned him  to improve efficiency at the company’s manufacturing plant in Shangai, China. During his first 90 days he came up with a list of quality issues and he shared this list with three of his direct reports (Mr. Zhu, Mr. Cao and Mrs. Ping). 

He asked them for input on how to mitigate the issues within the next 90 days and what the “low hanging fruit” were. He emailed them on Friday evening and asked them to respond by Monday morning, enough time to review over the weekend. While Dr. Jens Schmidt was sorting out his moving goods that finally arrived from Stuttgart and settled into his apartment, Mr. Zhu, Mr. Cao and Mrs. Ping went for lunch. They did not appreciate that they had to leave their families on the weekend but they knew this was important. On Sunday night Mr. Cao, the most senior, eldest and most experienced manager responded to the email.

“Dear Dr. Schmidt, thank you for the trust you are giving to your senior managers by sharing this report with us before sending it to the headquarters. We are fully on board with you and we think you and the quality assurance team in the headquarters will give good guidance on how to mitigate the issues presented in the report. We kindly ask that you inform us of any changes once you have discussed this report with the headquarters. With kind regards, Mr. Cao”.

On Monday, when Dr. Schmidt came back to the office, Mr. Zhu handed in his resignation. Two weeks later Mr. Cao and Mrs. Ping also resigned.

Now, Dr. Schmidt had to lead 50 engineers directly. He was using everything he knew that worked in Germany — especially in terms of performance appraisal, and yet the Chinese employees seemed to be losing efficiency and effectiveness by the week. After 90 days, many engineers had moved to other companies and Dr. Schmidt had a hard time to explain to HR why he needed to hire new engineers and managers in the middle of a global crisis. His 180 days report looked bleak. The quality issues had become worse and Dr. Schmidt had nothing to show for but failure.

It took quite some time and effort on Dr. Schmidt’s part to recognize that what worked in Germany in terms of critical and to-the-point feedback was actually demotivating to the Chinese employees, who were used to more positive reinforcement than pure critique. These positive comments motivated them to increase productivity and put forth that extra, discretionary effort. Once Dr. Schmidt changed his feedback and his communication style in general he noticed that productivity improved again. He was also able to win the managers and some of the employees back once he understood the importance of relationships and the concept of “face” in the Chinese culture.

Three years later he managed to leave the country with a good feeling. 

Feedback is Completely Misconstrued

According to the original mechanistic definition feedback occurs when an environment reacts to an action or behavior. For example, ‘customer feedback’ is the buyer’s reaction to a firm’s products and policies, and ‘operational feedback’ is the internally generated information on a firm’s performance. 

Originally, the idea was that feedback changes behavior. Criticism or praise is considered  feedback only if it brings about a lasting change in the recipient’s behavior. While I am generally critical of this assumption, I would like to explain here three major feedback styles that I have seen over my career. Often they work in a monocultural setting or when they are framed well. For example, critiques work well for writers and bloggers, the sandwich works well in an Anglo-Saxon environment and Hindi-style generally works well in Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

One major issue is that feedback often is NOT delivered well. Another issue is that often it is full of projections and that it has to be abused to justify why a good performer was not promoted. That is one of the key issues with feedback. For the next three styles we will assume that the feedback is well delivered, the feedback receiver asked for feedback and the feedback is not used as a justification for non-promotion or a performance rating.

German-Style: Pure Direct Critique

The German Style
The German Style

Clearly, people in Germany do not generally provide and receive feedback in the same way that people in China are used to doing. In fact, appraisal feedback can be very different across different cultures. Although not many like to do it, we know that critiquing – in a constructive and empowering way – others’ work is a crucial part of a manager’s job. However, critiquing someone often brings unwanted results and ends up hurting others even when this wasn’t the initial goal. This generally happens because criticism embodies two of the things that human beings hate the most, i.e. it calls for submission and it devalues. 

With a focus on what needs to be improved, this method works extremely well for writers, bloggers and co-creators. In many instances, authors actually request it. It’s also often used in educational circumstances, training contexts and examinations. Here it is important to focus on the work, instead of the person. For example, “In this report, capitalization is not applied consistently.” or “This paragraph is hard to understand because it contains a lot of passive constructions.” Germans love “Sachlichkeit” so the focus here is on the object, the piece of art, the work output, rather than the person delivering the work. The intention here is to improve the overall quality of the work output.

US-Style: The Sandwich Feedback

The original sandwich feedback technique entails something positive to warm up the discussion, followed by some criticism which is the real feedback one wants to give, and it wraps up with more praise, i.e. again something positive to soften the actual feedback. In other words, the sandwich feedback method involves discussing corrective feedback that is “sandwiched” between two layers of praise.

There are two ways to put the sandwich feedback technique in practice: 

  1. You start off with a positive comment, add constructive feedback with an explanation of how to improve, and end with another positive comment. 
  2. You begin with a contextual statement (I liked…because…Now/Next time…) and conclude with an interactive statement, e.g. a question based on the work done.

The Sandwich Feedback Model
The Sandwich Feedback Model

This method is particularly helpful to managers when they want to discuss problems with the employee’s behavior. It is especially useful for those managers who find it difficult to deliver corrective feedback. It is important to note that you need to ask for permission to give feedback and also find examples of where you observe what you find worth changing. Here you should focus on behavior, rather than the person and soften it with “tend to” and “I observed” and “what this does with me…”. Speak about how it affects you. This approach takes the name of Non-Violent Communication (NVC) and it was developed by the  American psychologist M. Rosenberg.

Hindi-Style: Focus on the Positive

Thumb Up
The Hindi Style Feedback

In Bangalore, I learned another feedback style which I call “Hindi-Style Feedback”. Basically, here you focus on the positive and remain silent on the negative. In order to save face you don’t confront the person you are addressing directly. If you have negative feedback you would tell this to an intermediary who then decides about how to approach the topic with the person.

This method works well in the Asian context or when you generally already have a high-performing team and nothing major goes wrong. Focussing and reinforcing the strengths and the positive behavior will lift employees up and encourage them to do more of this behavior. Also, I think it is important to build a personal relationship before delivering feedback and better to deliver it 1:1. If you are only correcting errors and you have agreed a more direct style to do that it is acceptable if you have a good relationship with your team members.

In the SIETAR conference in Dublin in a pre-congress workshop my colleague Adrienne Rubatos and I co-created a feedback map with the participants.

The Feedback Map
The Feedback Map (Rubatos, Weinberger, 2017)

We also suggested that feedback usually creates more harm than support and as humanistic coaches we therefore would propose to stop using performance management systems, Management by Objectives and certainly feedback. Where we feel feedback is helpful ONLY would be in learning situations, transitions and when it is explicitly demanded by the feedback-receiver.

I’m aware that this is a complete paradigm shift and that it will change our approaches to promotions, compensation, benefits, hierarchy and basically completely turn around how we work in organizations.

We are demanding a new approach to feedback. We promote an approach that is mindful, supportive and transcultural. 

Delivering Feedback like a Global Virtual Leader

Even if in a new cultural setting it’s useful to learn the cultural rules, perhaps through a cultural mentor, don’t assume that “going native” is always and necessarily successful. Most of the time, you will have to adjust your feedback style and create a blend with which you feel comfortable enough in the given setting and with the person you have in front of you. 

More and more often teams are global virtual teams (GVT) and there are no rules other than the rules the teams co-create.  We have vast experience working within global, virtual teams and you find further blog posts via https://globalpeopletransitions.com/?s=global+virtual+teams.

Alternatively, you can join our RockMe! program or the RockMeRetreat where we discuss these matters based on your leadership challenges.