Category Archives: Global Mobility

Feedback can be a blessing or a curse, depending on the context and the type of feedback. This experiential workshop takes us on a journey to examine giving and receiving feedback and to explore alternatives to traditional feedback exchanges.

Feedback and its Alternatives – an Exploration for Global, Mindful People

An explorative workshop with Adrienne Rubatos and Angie Weinberger applying concepts and tools based on the Vermeulen-Analysis-Model and the Vermeulen & Kinast coaching school.

An essential concern of this workshop is to deconstruct feedback in general, but especially the traditional Western approach of “giving feedback”, which still dominates the business world. Global folks are demanding a new approach to feedback, an approach that is mindful, supportive and transcultural.

The workshop will seek to support you in developing these new feedback styles.

Both facilitators have experienced constructive and destructive feedback, in the context of corporate, author or coaching roles directly with herself or with her clients. Indeed this was the starting point for deepening knowledge on the topic and for experimenting with new feedback forms.

Researching among global peers, general uncertainty in recommending suitable forms of feedback, especially between high and low context cultures can be observed. Surprisingly even in Western countries, traditionally known for directness, a new openness towards more creative, collaborative and non-hierarchal feedback styles is growing. Such feedback treated with reflection and mindfulness on both sides of the feedback process can lead to personal and professional growth.

The workshop invites participants to explore the concept of “mindful feedback” further.

Beside rich content, sharing of experiences among the participants and collective exploration of the topic, participants will also benefit from exploring alternative, less known methods: body learning, relationship explorations, dyads, meditation elements, sensing, metaphors, dancing, drawing, and spiritual wisdom. These interventions generally help to build self-awareness, self-confidence and a strong personal and leadership presence even in complex environments, like global teams.

The facilitators practice these in their everyday personal and professional lives. Most of them originate in the Vermeulen-Analysis-Model and the coaching school around it, which certified a limited number of coaches only.

We invite participants of low and high context cultures, both senior and junior professionals 

  • who want to deepen and widen his/her use of feedback and its alternatives
  • who want to enrich his/her coaching or training methods
  • who practice self-support and peer coaching
  • who want to sharpen his/herself-awareness through body work and mindful practices
  • who are open to exchange, experiment and learn in a collaborative style.

The workshop has multiple goals:

At a personal level

  • to review our past and create new personal experiences around feedback situations
  • to develop ourselves by learning new methods of collaboration, reflection, inquiry, self-coaching and deep-preparation for feedback situations

At the content level

  • to tackle, in a new depth and width, the components of, and the conditions necessary for, feedback
  • to look at methods and models to transform feedback, or even the wisdom to replace it

At the business application level

  • how we can learn to react, treat or receive feedback from our clients in a self-respecting way
  • to develop intercultural feedback styles for our clients, that they can apply to team members of various cultural backgrounds
  • to incorporate suitable technology designs, media and tools to receive messages from the clients (e.g. personal debriefing, social media, wish lists to the manager, feedback wall…)

Registration and Fee

This is a pre-conference workshop to the SIETAR Congress Dublin, 25 to 27 Mai 2017

www.sietareu.org/the-congress/pre-congress-workshops

Early Early Bird Fee until 28 Feb 2017 is EUR 390 (incl. 23% VAT).

The number of workshop participants is limited. First-come, first-served.

If you have any questions please contact us via adrienne.rubatos@t-online.de and angela.weinberger@globalpeopletransitions.com

Registration here.

Your facilitators


Adrienne Rubatos

Intercultural Consultant, Trainer and Executive Coach

Adrienne Rubatos is a senior change management and intercultural consultant, trainer and coach specialized on cooperation between East and West in Europe. She accompanies mainly multinationals in their complex international programs. Before, she gathered 16 years of industry and management experience, which took her around the globe. She holds a Master in Electrical-Engineering and an Executive-MBA degree, as well as various certifications in coaching, consulting and intercultural studies. She enjoys travels and languages, speaking six of them. Adrienne is an associate professor of IBR (global MBA program in Africa, Eastern-Europe, India, Israel) within Steinbeis University Berlin since twelve years, teaching currently HR. She is the author of diversophy®Romania, the book “Beruflich in Rumänien”, numerous articles and SIETAR conference papers. She descends from Transylvania, lives in Germany and works globally. Her growing passion is both meta-perspectives and small mindful and embodiment practices included to her work and life.

Angie Weinberger

Angie Weinberger

Global Career Advisor, Executive Coach and Global Mobility Expert

Angie Weinberger, who graduated in International Business Studies, lived and worked in Germany, the UK, India and Australia before moving to Zurich in 2009. She has worked in HR and Global Mobility in large global corporates like Winterthur, Deutsche Bank, PwC, LafargeHolcim for 20 years. She founded Global People Transitions offering intercultural executive and career coaching to internationally mobile professionals through programs such as HireMe! and RockMe! both for corporate and private clients. Angie has a systemic consultancy background and is a certified professional intercultural coach (B.Vermeulen & Dr.E. Kinast) with a focus on relationship building, mindfulness and body awareness. She is a founding and active Board member of SIETAR Switzerland and volunteers in a variety of social projects. She published various books, recently “The Global Career Workbook” – a self-help job search guide for internationally mobile professionals. She learns Arabic and loves Bollywood Dancing.


Guest Post by Valerie Priestley

Moving country and within a country has become a way of life for me. Along the road I learned first how to adapt to the employment market: going from a city to a little province town taught me the importance of researching employment possibilities and thus being able to make an educated decision: Could I only work in a market research consultancy specialized in the construction industry or was I agile enough to embrace a career change?

My next big move forced me to consider my family as a whole and decide what was best for us as a unit. The advantages of opening up to a new culture, mastering a new language, thus giving a huge life advantage to our two daughters, moving forward the career of my husband largely outweighed my newish promotion as a branch manager. This move which started as a bit of a dare soon evolved into a project which had to be led successfully. The integration of 4 people depended on it. The financial aspect came only second to the improvement of quality of life.

Working in the financial sector obviously helped me enormously to fathom out what our financial or taxation situation would be; i.e. no double taxation within the EU. We got help where needed to correctly appreciate the remuneration package that was laid on the table, for example to try and evaluate the cost of living, renting levels (1st item on a family budget),… We both activated our networks to gather as much information as possible before accepting the relocation. The head of HR of a big international company explained the different items they offered their expats. Other expats we got to know gently offered their time to walk us through their integration.  Their experience raised more questions, forced us stop and think about what we expected from the change in our -until then, very rewarding life, to examine what education we wanted to give our daughters, the effect on both our careers.

I took a huge amount of time and effort to get to know  where the schools were, how they operated, how easy it was to travel by public transport, what social life we could have, how the social security system and health insurance work and cost, where to find a GP, health specialist, shops… These every day details have to be taken into account to decide where you would like to settle down. This should not be underestimated: I have witnessed families failing to integrate because of a lack of prior questioning and knowledge.

Relocation agencies, are they worth it? The answer to that question relies not only on the quality of the provided service but also on the allocated budget. Their knowledge of the local market is an undeniable asset. But the last move unveiled yet another reality: some landlords are reluctant or totally against dealing with relocating agencies. So be prepared to have to roll up your sleeves if you want to make sure you live where you evaluated would be the best spot for you. Priority setting is a must: location versus cost of rent for example, this needs to be agreed upon by all involved in decision making.

Choosing a new home could be turned into a great opportunity for younger ones to feel involved in the decision-making process: before making visits our daughters were briefed to take care of certain missions. Each one was to concentrate on assigned rooms, take pictures and make note of what she liked most about it or what would make it hard for her and us to consider living in the property. The debriefing turned into a lively conversation and in the end help towards the success of the relocation.

I took the opportunity of each move abroad to master a new language: without a budget for it at first – I learned on the job. English then became kind of my second mother tongue or family language.  Language courses designed for expats or even better a one on one course should be included in a relocation package as speaking the local language is not only a question of politeness to the locals but also a passport to finding a job specially for the accompanying spouse or partner, a necessity to be understood by your new car mechanic, GP etc.

With the move the honeymoon period of the project finishes, the hard work of making a nest, joining communities starts. Join existing clubs to meet your new best friends.  Truth be told with each day you are given new opportunities to learn something new. I could not live without that challenge.

During this phase, discover and make the most of the new surroundings as you never know how much time you have to enjoy it. Life is full of surprises. No matter how well you planned your career, for example going back to university to retrain and find your dream job – my case, some economic or personal parameter changes and throws a spanner in your well-oiled system – my case !

And it is time to start afresh…new experience, new excitement, new opportunities to learn something…

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Valerie Priestley

Valérie Priestley is an experienced professional with a focus on HR and a background in both financial services and the marketing sector. Her thirst for knowledge and desire to help others grow led her to return to university and successfully gain a Masters in training in 2014. Bilingual French-English she rose to the challenge and now works in German.

Global Mobility Policies are biased

Traditional global mobility policies written by Western companies with their outlook on taxation, international assignments and a home-based compensation approach do not fit today’s world any longer. They had a cultural understanding of a nuclear family and terminology from the Army.

We Global Mobility Professionals often sound like we are at war. We speak about home and host country, expatriation, repatriation or hardship as if our patria or home territory was the only island of happiness in the world.

We coined the term “home leave” to suggest that only “at home” we can relax and enjoy our life, while at the foreign outposts in Mombasa and Rio de Janeiro we are at war with the local population.

As Global Mobility Professionals, we are surprised that the stream of inbounds and outbounds has changed. These days the main expatriation routes are no longer going out from Europe or the US. We see assignees from China going to Switzerland, India to Sweden and Indonesia to Holland. We managed London to New York and now it is Casablanca to Mombasa or Caracas to Madrid.

A lot of moves and a lot of different cultural assumptions question the traditional models.

What is “fair” in a global team?

It is hard to say what is “fair” in a global team. Will you accept that your colleague from India gets paid about 50% of your salary? Do you find it ethical that your passport qualifies you to a better standard of living? Is the home-approach still feasible in a non-colonial, non-hierarchical and skill-based “eco-system”? Are we innovative enough in Global Mobility or are we repeating patterns of society that are as outdated as the suit I’m wearing to work today?

We’ve known for years that expats discuss their benefits but they used to do it secretly back in the nineties. I’m pretty sure now there is a WhatsApp-Group to discuss your benefits package by location.

Why should you believe your employer is giving you the best package possible? Why should you believe that the policy applies in your case when everyone up in the higher ranks seems to get an exception?

Generation Y populates the workforce. The “I”-Generation is more individualistic and used to instant gratification. This generation does not accept a one-size fit all principle. Policy segmentation is a start but I think we need to customize our proposals to assignees and their families even further.

Coming from an egalitarian culture, being fair and giving fair chances to everyone has always been important to me. Over the years I have learned though, that the assignees with the best negotiation skills have the best packages. Female assignees and assignees from less assertive cultures on the other hand often accept what they have been offered. Their request for amendments is quiet and not understood.

Senior management can request anything and often is it granted. For them “policy” is almost like a red flag that needs to be challenged.

We assume that assignees need financial incentives and that financials are the major consideration point when deciding whether to go on an international assignment or not.

We should consider skill development, learning opportunities, living conditions and extra services and build them into the benefits matrix. Providing these will also give more equity in the host country. I also believe that the classical home approach won’t last very much longer. Until we can fully customize packages we will need better GM Technology, engaged Global Mobility Managers and above all HR leaders with an international mindset.

Angie Weinberger

You might also want to attend the “Building the Global Mobility Business Case”-Workshop by Expatise Academy in Amsterdam on 23 JAN 2018.

 


Guest Post by Uma Campbell


Graduation day has come and gone, and thousands of new grads around the world are now on the job hunt. While the job market is still highly competitive, new grads have the benefit of finding work in an increasingly global market. This means that there job prospects go beyond just the local listings but now graduates can easily access job opportunities from all over the globe. Many top careers are in demand all over the world, so new graduates looking for a chance to progress their career internationally can find job positions in cities and countries wherever they may desire. Here are some top careers that can take you around the globe:

Engineer – Engineering careers are in high demand all over the world and in many different fields of engineering. From petroleum engineers to architectural engineers, the field is growing rapidly with job openings always popping up for entry-level positions. The field is also known for being one of the highest paid positions especially for new graduates. Recent graduates looking to work in the field of engineering in any aspect will likely find positions available all over the world.

Physical Therapist- PTs are needed all over the world in both hospital settings and private practices. PTs help patients to recover from previous injuries to regain movement or manage pain. Many healthcare jobs are in demand globally and PTs are one of the most desired positions.

Registered Nurse- Many countries all over the world are experiencing a shortage in nurses. Thus the position is heavily in demand by many hospitals and many agencies are looking for newly graduated nurses to help supplement their staff. Although the average pay for nurses can vary between countries, positions are hardly scarce and new grads will usually be able to find openings at hospitals. A demand for private nurses also allows new grads opportunities to practice in their field and work internationally.

Statistician- Businesses are constantly in need of various kinds of financial analysts to help make important decisions and strategize. Statisticians help companies see patterns in profits and consumer spending. Their knowledge in reading such data can help executives figure out the best way to progress a company and become more successful. International companies, small startups and large corporations, are always looking for employees that can help foster their growth and statisticians are high in demand to help analyze data that can increase profits.

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Physician- Healthcare is one of the few industries that consistently see growth and demand year after year. Physicians in particular can find career opportunities all over the world. Although the road to becoming a physician can be demanding and involves several years of study, the career rewards in the end are tremendous. Opportunities to practice all over the world are plentiful and the earnings for new grads are typically higher than other healthcare positions.

Computer Analysts- As companies all over the world are reliant on technology and computers in their day-to-day operations, many organizations look to staff computer analysts and IT teams to help ensure that their technology is in top shape. It is no surprise that one of the best jobs for recent grads is working as a computer analyst. Computer analysts not only work to help with daily tech issues but also work with companies to make sure they are using their programs efficiently and effectively. They help organizations make sure they are using the best programs for their tasks. New graduates in this field will find that many companies are looking for freshly graduated students because of their up-to-date knowledge of programs and systems.

Teacher – Along with being considered one of the sexiest careers, teachers are one of the most in demand positions all over the world. From STEM teachers to English teachers, educators are needed in both city and rural settings as education becomes a priority for many countries looking to increase their citizens earning potentials.

Many of these positions are careers in the fields of STEM, but there are many other positions that are available for various other fields. Working internationally can be both a rewarding and challenging experience. New graduates should job at any opportunity they find to go abroad as it is a great way to advance their careers but also travel the world.

 

uma2Uma Campbell is a yoga instructor and freelance writer. She currently lives in Southern California. She enjoys writing about meditation, natural medicine, and home design.  Her interests include: home decor, yoga, and running. She also really loves crafting She has her own line of home-made jewelry. She lives alone with her cat and two turtles.

What is Ego?

After years and years of success in a corporate role my ego had been quite inflated until I

  1. a) moved to another country and
  2. b) started my own company several years later.

I notice an overinflated ego when I believe the world should be centered around me. Don’t get me wrong. It is ok to be self-confident, assertive and to believe in your own abilities but once in a while we need to accept that the world does not revolve around our needs alone. I think it is also healthy to learn that we are not perfect robots and that we embrace our fears and weaknesses.

Sometimes I feel offended if anyone acts as if I did not matter or if I did not have a say in a decision. Same is true if someone doubts my competence on a matter in which I feel highly competent. I hate when someone points out a mistake I made, even if it is a small one because in my self-image I don’t make “mistakes”. My self-image is that of a competent professional. However, competent and perfectionist is different. A competent person can do the job in a reasonable time. A perfectionist wastes time on detail that does not add value to the process or should be automated. Think of additional flowers you paint into a landscape.

As opposed to the image others have of you, you might feel that you do not always meet your own standards. When I am in a good mood, I tend to blame my lazy inner PA Amber Valentine, who sucks at her job.

When I am in a weak mood though (angry, hungry, lonely or tired), it could happen that a small error triggers an emotional landslide with elephant raindrops coming out of my eyes. Most of the time I later admit to myself, that most of these incidents are not about me and if I assume positive intentions, than I often see the other person’s perspective. We all just try to find solutions with the means and ideas we have at hand.

I also noticed that often we all misunderstand each other more than we actually understand each other. We easily feel criticized, when the other person tried to support or help us.

How does Ego get in the Way of Collaboration?

Once your ego has been hurt you will probably look for ways to “repair” the damage. This could happen by getting into fights with colleagues about nitty-gritty details or by showing constantly to others how superior you are too them. It’s a habit of highly intelligent colleagues, that they like to point out the flaws of an idea or that they push away an argument with a derogatory comment. (Isn’t it obvious that my argument makes sense?)

As a leader, you need to simplify and find explanations that are easy to grasp.

When you apply mathematics for example, I always liked, how one of my best math teachers in high school would teach us the way to derive the formula instead of just learning the formula (which unfortunately was often asked in business classes at university). Why would you waste brain space to learn something by heart that you can now easily recreate with a macro. If you don’t understand the macro, then you have an issue.

When you struggle with simple calculations

A few weeks ago it took me at least 15 minutes to figure out why I did not get a simple balance sheet calculation. I would say, I am good with numbers, but I need to have a bit of clarity in presentation too. This takes a bit of practice though and most of us think, that our presentation and writing is clear to others, while most of the time it is only clear to those who come from a similar background and have gone through a similar kind of education, training and practice. Someone with 20 years of work experience might judge cases more based on gut feeling than fact data. I remember hearing the same from Risk Managers, Doctors and Lawyers. I sometimes don’t know how to explain my judgement other than gut feeling so I need to rationalize it for others to understand where I am coming from.

It’s the same with delegating tasks. If you are not explicit what you need, by when and from whom you might not get anything or you only get half of what you expected. Most of the time you will therefore be disappointed by your collaborators or team members.

However, if you ego is in your way you might feel that you should be irreplaceable and you will create barriers to the flow of knowledge and barriers to collaboration. These barriers could even be sub-conscious. When we work with global, virtual teams to improve collaboration and performance, we teach you basic rules for true collaboration and we also practice ways to build trust and reduce ego-driven moves.

As a manager of such a global, virtual team, you will face challenges of compensating your team members in a fair manner and one or the other might have a better way of showing their contribution to a project and getting the credit.

Four Tips for Reducing your Ego-driven Actions

Nurture yourself: Your inner child most probably has not fully grown up yet. Nurture it and feed it. Look at your needs.

Develop collaboration principles: If you want to collaborate with others develop a common set of principles that you can fall back on in case of doubt.

Accept new tasks and projects with humbleness: Accept that you will have to learn when you move into a new role, a new project or a new task. Learning takes energy and effort. Stay humble.

Show true compassion: You could start with balancing your ego with moments of true compassion and support. Then you have a chance to become a leader, instead of a manager.