Category Archives: Global Mobility

#1 Psychologise* your Price

Price in the professional services industry is nothing else than a value we give to an experience. I have already mentioned that when we spend there are pain points (like repairing the car) and there are pleasure points (like a manicure). Sometimes spending money on an experience that gives us a good feeling about ourselves or improves our general well-being feels like a treat. You probably feel great when you can buy a bottle of champagne on a weekend trip or book a wellness spa instead of an ordinary hotel. Today we slave away so we can have more luxury in our lives. We are normally way beyond the basic needs of the Maslow pyramid.

But wait. You are an entrepreneur. You just started your business a year ago? You still can’t pay the bills? You still depend financially on your spouse, your parents or in-laws or the state? Well that’s normal but remember: You are not your clients. You have to separate your sense of worth from your clients. Usually we serve clients in a higher income bracket than us. We solve an issue that they cannot or do not want to solve themselves because either they are too busy with other stuff or they have enough money to buy your services so they can have more free time to play golf, hang out with their children or go on spa weekends to de-stress.

#2 Create your Client

So, before you even think about service packages and pricing create your clients. Imagine you can decide how your client functions. Understand what bothers them. Understand how they would love to spend their time. Understand what their pain and pleasure points are. Keep an inventory. (I run a regular list of the 10 most annoying items when moving to Switzerland and one of the 10 most cherished items. These lists are discussed in trainings. Most participants instantly get it, some don’t. I prefer to work with the ones who connect. I also prefer to work with clients who get my humour BTW.)

#3 Target the Threshold

For some reason it is always easier to pay an amount that is slightly lower than the next bigger amount (even though the price might be ridiculously high in the first place). For example I accept to pay CHF 95 for a manicure but if it was CHF 100 I would not buy this service anymore. So target the next big number but then stay slightly below. Obviously you should do market research and find out what competitors are charging for similar services but your clients normally don’t just come to you because of your price. Often it is a mixture of trustworthiness, competence that you are eluding, recommendation and good reputation. If your service was interchangeable they would get it online for free.

#4 Package the Pain

The pain is in the beginning. In the meantime I prefer to pay for packaged deals. Slowly I am introducing this idea to my clients as well. For you it means: Less minute-counting, less invoices, less hassle and better cash flow (if you can agree advance payments). BUT for your client: It means that they have the pain once and then for a long time they feel good and enjoy your service. J

#5 Reduce the Rebate

In the beginning of our business we tend to work with a small group of people we already know. We give them better prices than our usual clients. While it is natural that you want to give a favourable rates to your family members and their friends consider the impact this will have on your annual turnover. Over time you need to reduce those rebates and freebies. I prefer to work pro-bono once in a while and clearly call it charity to having clients that cannot afford me. Also, if you feel insecure about your own performance or if you test a new service you can run a pilot and ask people to spend their time giving you important feedback and suggestions in exchange for a free ride. Make sure that you always communicate the real price value of a free service. If you get squeezed by clients let them know on the invoice which services you provided in addition to what you got paid for. (Don’t let them squeeze you all the time though.)

 

Task: How will you create a good pricing model for your business?

 

*I do not think “psychologise” is a commonly used verb but this is actually what you need to do.

Have you ever been in a situation where your initial reaction was fear showing by you getting worried that you’ll be losing everything, been found an imposture or knowing that you’ll be criticized for something you knew was a bit risk

 

With a bit of distance you probably noticed that all of these situations were harmless and that you made them a lot bigger with your fear.

I have probably told you already that even after having graduated more than 15 years ago I still have a recurring dream that I failed at Math (which funnily enough was one of my best subjects ever).

Seven Shades of Fear

I thought that if I am ridden by fear, it might be that you face fears as well. Have you recently had any of those?

 

  • Fear of not being genuinely likeable and just being liked because you have money, work for a brand, you have influential friends etc. (1)
  • Fear of not being good enough and being found out (2)
  • Fear of not taking enough charge and being considered slack (3)
  • Fear of losing everything and ending up under a bridge (4)
  • Fear of spiders, cats, airplanes (5)
  • Fear of your imminent death (6)
  • Fear of getting too close to someone and possibly getting hurt (7)

 

As we become older (not wiser) we see more risks and it is legitimate to decide that certain risks are too high for us to take in this situation of our lives. However, fear should not stop us from doing anything that is important to us.

Just do it and work with your fear

That allowed me to attend a wedding in Pakistan (probably the safest trip I have been on in the last few years), start my own business by leaving a well-paid job and going on a two-day alpine hike with sneakers (sliding down a snow field on my butt).

 

Fear is a compass but when fear turns into anxiety it blocks your ability to live the life you want. As a coach I advise you apply these seven techniques:

 

1)   If you are afraid of a project: Break it down in very small items and tasks. Manage one task every day.

2)   If you are afraid of not being likeable work for charity. Do something for others without expecting any reward.

3)   If you see yourself procrastinating write of your fear to friends. Commit to a first action step.

4)   If you are afraid of losing everything start to budget your spending, learn about finances and start saving money.

5)   If you have an anxiety disorder such as fear of animals seek therapy. There are ways to heal these anxieties.

6)   If you are afraid of dying work on your physical health and get advice how you can improve your health. Start small walks.

7)   If you are afraid of loving someone who might break your heart love someone who loves you first and shows you love through action. (Or get a dog.)

 

Task: Which fear would you like to tackle first?

More reading

Do you wish fear didn’t hold you back? ​

7 steps to overcome the fear of pursuing your passion or basically anything

Feel the fear and do it anyway – Amazon

Grundformen der Angst

 

Fear of something can be a sign of a “shadow” according to C.G. Jung

http://www.schattenarbeit.de/wasist.html

 

Valeria_Foto_Profilo

by Valeria Crescenzi

Hi there! I am Valeria and let me start by thanking Angela for this opportunity to share my personal experience about relocating to Switzerland. I hope that my story has the chance to help people who might be thinking about jumping to a foreign country.

I’m not far from my native place but my life in Zürich is completely different from the one in Rome. To be honest until the end of 2013 Switzerland wasn’t in my plans. I moved to Zürich in January 2014.

A new experience

To me living abroad is a brand new experience: born and raised in Rome, I was pretty sure that my life would have been there all along. I’ve never lived in other countries enjoying such an international environment as the one in Zürich. I am 31 years old and moving here meant, first of all, coming back to school. In a broad sense: I am really going to school everyday to rapidly learn German but, more importantly, I am learning a new way to deal with life. All the expected things in Italy, here are not to be taken for granted. Even going to the grocery shop is different.

I had to start again from scratch, building up, day after day, my new Swiss life. How did I change so far? I am more curious, more aware of what happens around me and I am using Wikipedia and language dictionaries as never before! Joking aside, even thought my coffee is still Italian, my phone is fluent in Italian, English and German, my computer is Swiss and my new friends come from all over the world. I am also understanding the real meaning of the word “flexibility”, the ability to being responsive to change.

 

An idea to become self-employed

Regarding my professional transformation, my mind was already set on the idea to be self-employed. So that, I began to collect information even before moving. This made me aware of the characteristics of the Swiss job market reinforcing my desire to go solo. My first 7 months helped grasp the reality behind what I had researched in advance and to explore the community, through participation in many networking events.

I also re-analyzed my previous professional experiences countless times. Reality check: done. In June I started to be a “singlepreneur”. My baby is Crescenzi Communication, a communication “solo-agency” fluent in Italian and English (we are gearing up for German). Starting your own business in a foreign country is not trivial. More than formal bureaucracy – which is very lightweight here – the major challenge is facing the specific cultural gap. You never know what you are giving for granted about what is allowed and what isn’t.
In the start-up phase of Crescenzi Communication I am also learning to push myself forward not caring about blushing (forget old shy Valeria) and to rely on other people.

Again…it’s all about learning. To close let me say that success is not granted but, as a Williams quote says, I’m not telling you it’s going to be easy, I’m telling you it’s going to be worth it“.

 

Contact me

Valeria Crescenzi
Crescenzi Communication
Web: www.crescenzi.ch
Mail: info@crescenzi.ch
Phone: 0041 76 688 53 06
FB: www.facebook.com/crescenzicommunication
Twitter: @CrescenziComm

For this year we planned to experiment. Sounds funny right?

So one of these experiments is that we invited bloggers to tell us about how their transition to Switzerland has changed their outer and inner life. The results are showing women with different voices and different stories. All of them have shown a lot of courage. We admire them for what they have mastered. We love their voices and we love how they admit their anxieties and shortcomings.

Going abroad is an adventure. It changes us deeply. Some of us can never stop and settle again. Others just want to do that. Let’s see what our bloggers want to share from Tuesday onwards. Every Tuesday a new post will appear. Your comments are appreciated and please share as much as possible.

 

Thank you

GPT-Team

 

We are all focussed on our immediate need these days (“I need to get this done NOW.”)​. When you run a startup this thinking changes a lot as suddenly you just need to do one thing: Make others happy! In that sense I sometimes browse through posts and share a lot of knowledge and insights via Social Media.

I have just browsed through this article and had to laugh about one sentence. I thought it was worth sharing with you and hope you like the post.

“From an organisational design point of view, GM is a subset of HR. But when HR went through a redesign, GM was left out, because it was regarded as being a bit strange and too difficult to do. It often has its own software, its own reward and HR policies, and so on. Consequently, mobility was left in the ‘too difficult to solve’ box, and we see that with our client base.”Andrew Robb, L​eader of Deloitte’s Global Mobility Transformation Team​

We have a lot to catch up on and a lot of work to especially around the interface of talent management, succession planning and Global Mobility.