Author Archives: Angie Weinberger

Recently I wrote about how important it is to clean up regularly…not only at home but especially in your work space. As I know how hard it is for horders and messies I have developed this quick course with five S-words. Here is my quick guide for de-cluttering:

  • Systemize: Create an overview and make a plan. Decide on color-codes, three box system and buy a laminator.
  • Start: Start with the smallest possible entity and work on it for only half an hour.
  • Sort: If you clean out drawers take out all items, then sort them and decide what you would like to throw away. Then throw it away and take the bins outside. Return to the same content and review again. You might want to throw out more. Celebrate again. Clean the empty drawer right away.
  • Space : Create an empty space between fuller spaces. See what happens. Review the way you work with space. Share work space to keep it clean and tidy.
  • Standardize: Use same colors and basics your wardrobe. Reduce the amount of handbags and shoes you are using. Donate them if you don’t want to throw them away.

I would be interested in coaching you if you have an issue with clutter. Let me know if you are interested in a first conversation.

Overtaken by ‘paper’? For many of us it is worse than any other five-letter word.  It’s because paper can weigh you down and hold you back. Getting rid of paper and other stuff is a spring cleaning for the soul that will make you more productive. Here’s why.

►Let go of your fear and depart from the comfort zone.

You might have noticed that when you don’t feel in your comfort zone you need to have something in writing to hold on to. You can reduce complexity by having a plan or calendar of events on the wall. You might reduce your stage fright by writing down and scripting speeches and conference calls.

Retro-Vintage-Ads-Altered-Bitch-style-473What it means to let go is that you need to remember more but also that you focus on what’s really important. In the name of productivity I am trying to avoid tasks that do not add value to my business or my clients. In the old days we used to spend hours sorting and deleting emails or filing documents. Being a business owner now I am trying to reduce such work to a bare minimum as I have found out that if I cannot find something it is usually mainly because I am stressed and frantically look for it. In normal mode I find all my documents on the laptop by working with the search function. I don’t need to file documentation on certain topics because most of it can be found online. If you need a filing system for collaboration make it simple and self-explanatory.

►Simplify and standardize by reducing clutter.

Simplifying can also be done at home. I don’t have an extensive wardrobe. Reading articles on productivity made me standardize my clothes even more so I don’t have to take decisions about what to wear. I also place matching clothes together on the rack.

 

►Use color codes, the three-box system and laminated signs to sort your office.

In our office I use a very clean and color-coded physical filing system. It helps me find files that I need to see printed. It also helps me to grab the right file when I am on my way to a client. Most of the time I work without paper though. The three-box system is very simple. You need to have three boxes and give them three functions: box 1: bin / recycling, box 2: donations and box 3: treasures. You need to ensure that you go to throw away the bin right away. The treasures you can put in a box and leave them there until your next spring cleaning.3

►Take the first step by sorting for half an hour a day.

One important tip when you start to work on this process is to limit it to half an hour a day. Set the clock and reward yourself afterwards for example by buying yourself a bunch of flowers.

►Clutter is equivalent to emotional baggage.

Letting go of clutter means to learn to rely more on your brain. Tell us what you do to sort out your clutter and find order in your life!

Read this related blog post.

 

 

11078071_990750944286698_8841507939481156323_nDSCN4689The Women Expo Switzerland is the longest running, largest table exhibition in Switzerland which is solely dedicated to the promotion and showcasing of female owned businesses.

Exhibitors at the Women’s Expo Switzerland are female business owners who want to build and establish new business contacts, present their products, and educate visitors about their services in person. These female businessCBRAFEJVAAALrm1 owners also want to build business relationships with other female business owners. Visitors to the Women’s Expo Switzerland are 98% women from a professional background aged between 30 – 49 years who come from both the English and German speaking communities.

On 29th March, 2015, we had the privilege to be a part of Women Expo. It was in collaboration with Children First Association, which provides high quality care and education to babies, toddlers and small children up to seven years in the international community in Zurich.

The event turned out to be more than we were expecting. The crowd was energetic and interested in networking. Overall, the Women Expo is an amazing opportunity for women to showcase their businesses and we recommend female entrepreneurs in Switzerland to follow them for future events. We also hope that the connections we made there will lead to fruitful cooperations and clients.

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Women Expo 2015 with @cfa2011 and @GPTransitions

 

 

Guest Blog by Morgane A. Ghilardi

So, I was an 18-year-old BA student, had just gotten both my first apartment – a tiny studio in a slightly scary neighborhood –, and my first real, paid job – with a slightly scarier boss. Life had suddenly gotten very serious; being fiscally responsible and self-sufficient was no longer reserved to adults.

It took me a while to adjust to the situation, as the reality of being in charge of prp_working-mom-300x300.jpgutting food on the table, paying rent, and what seemed like an unreasonable amount of bills – don’t even get me started on Billag – was completely overwhelming. Nonetheless, I remember thinking to myself that I was the third generation in a family of strong women who have always been in charge of providing not only for themselves, but also for their families.

Although that thought is a comforting reminder of the determination and strong desire for independence that runs in the family, it has also been a source of anxiety. My great-grandmother and grandmother left France to live and work in Switzerland, while my mother was born in Zurich in the 1960s. In spite of speaking two of the national languages, all of them faced adversity for being foreigners.

And of course, they all experienced a Switzerland in which women were still expected to adhere to traditional gender roles, even after being granted the right to vote and access to the political sphere on a federal level in 1971. All of them had to work hard with less (if any) chances of promotion and lower wages than their male equals, while also providing for the family.

Husbands and fathers were not a constant in that equation – though not always by choice –, which is why I always saw these women’s autonomy as an extraordinary achievement considering the context of Swiss culture. However, I am also very aware that life has been neither easy nor fair to them. How does my life compare to that?

Now 24 years old and nearing an MA degree in English and Gender Studies, I recognize both my privileged position and the challenges ahead. While I am grateful for the education and professional opportunities I’ve had so far, I still see that these are strange times for working men and women in Switzerland.

Gender roles, which are deeply connected to economic and social structures, are still being negotiated and tested; we experience that in everyday life. Stay-at-home and part-time working dads and husbands are not an accepted norm yet. In the media, we witness a discomfort towards women’s claim for equal opportunities, as it is spun into some kind of epic battle of the sexes or an attempt to drown out the voices of men who also are struggling in this fast-changing society.

Looking at both women’s past and future as providers, it is obvious that we have been navigating uncharted waters, and that won’t change for some time. But if we just keep in mind that we have the right to ask for support and acceptance, that this is a path that we tread as a collective but also as individuals, we never need to feel like we have to apologize for being overwhelmed and apprehensive at times.

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Morgane A. Ghilardi, MA students at the University of Zurich & editor at Adwired AG 

Twitter: @MorganeGh

LinkedIn: Morgane A. Ghilardi