Category Archives: Expat Lifestyle
Expat Experience

Why Building Relationships is Harder for You

Turning into a Swiss Person

I sat on a panel, and I just got as far as saying “I think…” when the other panelist gave her opinion on the matter. She probably didn’t notice that I was trying to say something, but for a moment, I was annoyed and thought, “how rude…”. 

Funnily, many years ago in Germany, this would probably have been okay for me. However, I notice now how I have turned into a “Swiss person”. I also tend not to want to work with Germans who have just arrived in Switzerland because I notice in what they do too many of my own mishaps and small failures back when I was a newbie in Switzerland.

Having lived here in Zurich for over ten years now, I prefer to run my life Swiss-style. Despite considering myself open and tolerant, I still mess up intercultural communication. I’m not always understood, and sometimes I’m just wrong. I recently had a long discussion about left and right, and I know I have a weakness there. In the end, I found out that I muddled up left and right (again!).

Sometimes “Global English” also makes it worse: A bunch of non-native speakers trying to communicate in their second language can lead to misunderstandings and unnecessary emotions.

Here are eight reasons that might make it harder for you to build professional relationships right now. And I don’t think that the pandemic is the main reason.

Eight Reasons

  1. You are shy, introverted, or not convinced that you are good enough to deserve success. Many partners suffer from the “impostor syndrome,” a psychological state of mind where people doubt their own accomplishments or consider themselves frauds just about to be exposed, especially if their career-driving partner just got another promotion in another country.
  2. You are embarrassed and ashamed of being “unemployed”. This is especially hard in a society where most of your self-worth is driven by your career and how busy you are.
  3. You come from a home culture where achievement is overly emphasized. In this cultures ascription is considered an unfair privilege while at the same time you are blindsided by the fact that you had an ascribed status in your home turf.  Fons Trompenaars and Charles Hampden-Turner associated the achievement dimension with protestant work ethic and belief. 
  4. You underestimate the cultural and value diversity in Switzerland. Even if Switzerland is the home of Zwingli and Calvin, there are catholic cantons where status, just like in the protestant cantons, is often equated with a family name, wealth, and how many generations you have already been a member of this society. So, there is still a strong ascription component that is not so obvious to outsiders. You don’t recognize that you have been in the out-group until you join the “Circle of Trust.”
  5. You are unaware of how you come across in person and assume that your style and behavior are “normal.” For example, you have not yet learned to read the cultural cues that hint that you might be too pushy or rude. A typical example in Switzerland is that newbies tend to overstretch a time commitment. In a society that runs on the clock and is a role model of the sequential time approach according to E.T. Hall’s time dimensions, not respecting this often creates a lot of stress for the other person.
  6. You are sending messages to mark your status in your home turf, such as the “Dr.” title in Germany. Or hint at your seniority by name-dropping the influential VIPs you used to hang out with. Still, this is either not understood or considered boasting, narcissistic, and merely annoying in Switzerland. (You could even exaggerate your qualifications and background, for all we know!)
  7. You interrupt your counterpart because you feel that they are slow. The Swiss tend to speak slower than many other Europeans, but they don’t like to be interrupted in their thought process as they are used to having a voice and being asked for their opinion on everything.
  8. You come from a high-context culture and you feel like you don’t know how to address a “stranger”  adequately.  You don’t know how to phrase your requests (your “ask”) to them, and they don’t understand you at all.

Relationship Segmentation Can Be a Barrier

Over the years of running my own business and projects, I often noticed that all the tools I tested to maintain a strategic approach to networking failed miserably with the extensive network that I’ve built over my professional life. 

So, I decided to let go of “strategy” and follow my gut and memory. I realized that the best idea is not to worry too much about “contact segmentation.” We Germans love the word “Begriffsabgrenzung”, so we also do this to our social life (“Bekannter, Kollege, Freund, Verwandter, Familie, Partner, Ehepartner…”). It’s a step-by-step approach, showing how much you trust the other person.

The same segmentation exists in Switzerland, but there are “false friends”( e.g., the word “Kollege” means “Work Colleague” in High German and “Friend” in Swiss German). In Switzerland and Germany, the informal ways of addressing a person with “Du” have different meanings.

Without intercultural training, a German manager will behave like a bull in a china shop in Switzerland – completely unintentionally. Hence, working with German managers in the “honeymoon phase” is a lot of work for the trainer or coach. I prefer to work with you when you are beyond the honeymoon phase, and you understand that you might not function in Switzerland like you are used to.

A Fluid Approach

My colleagues have become friends over the years, and some of my best friends from my university days or early career are colleagues or clients now. Some of my team members have become family, and some of my family members work in the same field or closely related ones. And some friends will never pay you while others will insist on giving back. The world is colorful, and so are people.

While saying this, I don’t want to imply that you have to like everybody you work with or network with. However, it’s another atmosphere for collaboration and innovation when you can fully trust the other person, and know in your head and heart that this person would never talk badly about you behind your back and would not spill your secrets with your competitors. 

Safe and collaborative environments require “relationship work.” 

Let me know what you are doing today to work on your business relationships.

Attention through Roses

What beautiful sunny weather, we have had the chance to enjoy these last few days! You might, as I do,  make a point of benefiting from the last golden rays of the sun to soak up as much vitamin D as possible before the days become even shorter. Who doesn’t need that energy to accomplish everything that needs to be done, everything you want to do?  You might be in a position right now where either you are worried about losing your job, or you are already looking for a new job (or any kind of work). Maybe you have even been looking for a while already. Perhaps you feel it’s time to update your resume and your job searching skills, just in case. Anyhow, I thought you could use this reminder from my older publication, “The Global Career Workbook,” on how to get a Swiss recruiter’s attention.

Getting a Swiss recruiter’s attention is almost like asking her out on a date. 

When you write a cover letter, you want the other person to like you and find you attractive enough to read your resumé. The cover letter is your appetizer, and the resumé is your main course. If you get to the interview stage, then that’s like having dessert on the first date. And after three interviews, you might get kissed. I mean, you might get the job offer you are longing for.

Don’t spoil the Swiss recruiter’s appetite by presenting the main course in the cover letter.

Imagine you are on your first date, and your counterpart tells you for half an hour how great they are. Rather boring, right? You zoom out of the conversation and wish to run away. The same is true if a recruiter reads your whole resumé already in the cover letter.

What could you do to make the conversation more interesting?

Cover letter writing is an art. With modern technology, applicants often do not see the need to write a cover letter these days, but in my opinion, it is the most artistic part of a good application. Emphatically,  in Switzerland, IT’S A MUST.

Many recruiters want to read it. They would like to see that you made an effort to get that interview. I receive considerable amounts of cover letters, and most of them sound like they were copied from a textbook. Nobody gets excited reading some sort of ‘copy and paste’ write-ups, void of personal touch.  Only the more personal ones gain my attention. They have to be personal, crisp and show me who you are.

Here are rules for fresh cover letters:

  • Use the correct name of the recruiter instead of Sir or Madam. Take out time to research the recruiter’s name. This portrays you as serious. Make sure you also spell the names of references correctly. Be respectful and address recruiters formally.
  • Make the letter appealing and nice-looking by using one font only and adhering to standard letter writing style in the country you are applying to.
  • Speak about the needs of the other party before you speak about yours. This is so important because the prospective job is about what you can bring to the table.
  • Find a personal connection between either you and the company or you and the recruiter. Maybe you use one of their products, or associate positive feelings with the brand because of a personal story.
  • If you copy and paste (which is not a good idea in general), please check that you did not use the wrong company name or contact person. It helps to read the letter out loud.
  • Use active language and complete sentences. When I say active language, I ask you to use more verbs than nouns, avoid passive constructs and keep sentences short.
  • If you are not an English native speaker, check your translation and let a native speaker review your grammar. Most recruiters get irritated when they find grammatical errors in cover letters.
  • Be brief and stick to a maximum of one page. Five paragraphs are sufficient.
  • Add your contact information in the last paragraph, especially your phone number and email ID. Make sure your email sounds respectable, and the name is memorable. Email addresses like ‘sexynancy@gmail.com’ are not acceptable.
  • Avoid slang and casual writing style. You are a professional, so behave like one! Even if you are from Generation Y or Z, remember that this is a letter and not a chat. The person you want to date might be the age of your parents.

Here’s to the sunny weather, boosting your energy to take that next important step: preparing your application file. I hope these tips help you write the best cover letter you can write to catch the Swiss recruiters’ attention, get to the “dessert” stage, and get you the job you are hoping for! 

 

HireMeExpress 2022 – Pre-Workshops for all Club Members

I will teach you insights on 

Workshop No. 1:  Partnering Masters – Building Effective Relationships

Workshop No. 2: Powerful Missions – Having a Voice in a Sea of Noise

Workshop No. 3: Persisting Mindsets – Designing Work to Support a Global Lifestyle

 

All invites will be shared when you sign up on our HireMeExpress list

*****

Reminder: Sign up here to find out everything you need to know in order to land a job in Switzerland or another market you are not familiar with. We will send you our 19 Fresh Resume Checkpoints and further material such as videos. In case you have any questions you can email us via angela@globalpeopletransitions.com.

NABEHA LATIF

Everything you Need to Get Started on LinkedIn

GUEST POST BY NABEHA LATIF

With all the world going digital and businesses indulging more in online servicing, communications and social interactions have therefore been more of a hot spot, especially with the likes of LinkedIn helping now Freelance and stay-at-home workers connect and grow themselves.

LinkedIn is by no means a new platform or in its early stages, a well-established and maintained social platform for business-minded individuals and professionals. However, does being a professional on LinkedIn or being a veteran on the site mean you have the best profiles out there? Not at all! Much like everything else, each passing moment calls for a new development that brings multiple changes to the platform. So this brings up the question, how do you get the professional and sleek-looking profile to stand out?

As an ever-growing platform, certain aspects call for a sturdy base for an end-user, and such can be obtained by adding on and working around a few LinkedIn Must-Haves to boost your profile out into the digital world. LinkedIn requires each individual to start off by creating their own profile, but that’s where the majority of the users leave it. There are so many options, tips, and tricks to get the most out of your profile and make it attractive.

1 – Use your Real Name

Your name and title should be exactly how it is in your real life. Please refrain from using nicknames or pseudo names, just like you won’t dare on your resume. LinkedIn is a professional site, full of professionals and businesses looking to get the most of out their work. Hence, keeping it professional yourself will help you get on the bandwagon, people are looking for solutions, not gimmicks!


       
2 – Use A Professional Headshot

At a glance, your name and photo are the most commonly viewed piece of information regarding yourself. Adding a professional headshot provides the first visual representation of you – do your best!. Remember, it will make your profile seven times more likely to be viewed by others.
       

3 – Optimize Location

Setting your location as accurately as possible helps businesses and other people look for the ones around them, so optimize yours to the best it can be. It’ll help you network where you will work geographically.  It doesn’t apply to Freelancers/Digital Nomads yet I would recommend you to stay honest regarding your location as preferred by the clients/companies.

4 – Profile Headline

We often wish to see a trailer of an individual before we get to know them for a better understanding, your LinkedIn Profile Headline is just that! You’ve got 110 characters to aptly describe yourself professionally.

5 – Industry Alignment

Looking for a business to match your skill set? You’ll need to be more visible, to make that happen. With the right words and by being specific about your industry, you’re paving a way for potential employers and connections.


6 – Get Connected

At its core, LinkedIn is still a social platform and what do we do on social platforms? Get social! Getting “LinkedIn” the site is part of the name. If you don’t have enough LinkedIn connections, you simply might not show up on as many LinkedIn searches as a 2nd-degree connection as you should.

7 – Be Reachable

It should be easy to find you on other social networks. This is crucial in checking your credibility as a person.  Provide your email address and do add links to Twitter/Facebook even if you don’t use them in a professional capacity.

Flex a little: Add items to your profile, such as projects, test scores, courses, patents, certifications, and volunteering/causes. Looking for work? 42% of hiring managers surveyed say they view volunteer experience as equivalent to formal work experience.

Make it Easy to Get Hired on LinkedIn

Now that you’ve got your head above the crowd, how about we get yourself on stage? With the basics covered and brimmed with your details, let’s get into the nooks and crannies to make it a tight seal.

  • Stacking up on Experience: Work on adding more experience and skills. Being a Swiss army knife in this regard with tons of skills and expertise in your repertoire will help you stand out as well as be a prominent prospect for anyone looking to hire  Here are a few suggestions: Social Media, Newsletters, Copy Editing, Web Content, News Writing, Speech Writing, SEO, Email Marketing, Creative Writing, Online Journalism, etc. You can further add Knowledge Management, Learning Management Systems, Talent Management to represent your teaching skills.
  • Tell Us About You: The basics will help lay the foundation, but you’ll need to ice the cake to make it look pretty! Show examples of your work, i.e. Youtube or Vimeo videos, presentations from Slideshare/Prezi/PowerPoint, documents from the scribe, word.
  • Vanity URLs: Create a vanity URL to make your look sleek and extra presentable. Use a customized URL like linkedin.com/in/JohnWick rather than linkedin.com/pub/john-wick/4a/z89/145/
  • Consistent Posting: Make it a weekly habit to post, comment, and endorse your connections on LinkedIn. Update your status on a regular basis. Share thoughtful/insightful news within your industry.
  • Endorsements: Endorsements may likewise influence how you show up in LinkedIn searches made by users looking for similar people or results. Multiple billion endorsements are given out since LinkedIn’s initiation (10 million on a daily basis)! A normal number of endorsements per LinkedIn client is five. It is a simple method for being better in search results than expected!
  • Polish Your Achievements: Add accomplishments, publications, blogs, certifications, and licenses. Bring out those tidbits of information and experience you have under your belt, even a little goes a long way!
  • Recommendations: Get recommendations and endorsements on the skills from colleagues/friends on LinkedIn. That’ll help people trust your skill set more once it’s endorsed by other individuals. On LinkedIn you’ve got to establish your credibility, so get on the grind and ask for them!

NABEHA LATIF
Digital Media Consultant

About the Author

Nabeha Latif is a Digital Media and Branding Consultant who specializes in leveraging online marketing channels to achieve desired goals. Since after her majors in digital marketing, she has collaborated with names like UN, Ali Baba Inc, Uber, UNESCO, UNDP to name a few. She is also actively involved in providing business development services related to marketing.

Additional Resources

Have you ever dreamt of being your own boss and opening your very own food business or culinary establishment? Whether your dream is a restaurant, a bakery, a bar, or a coffee shop – here are four useful tips to help you set up your business in Switzerland. 

#1 Decide on the Location

If you decide that you want to start a gastronomic business, one of the first questions you should ask yourself is where to open it. The right location plays a significant role as you are participating with many other businesses for customers and they might not allocate value to taking a long way to your shop. Especially as most of your customers will probably be walk-in customers. However, you should also not invest too much into the rent of your location. This link might help you to get a feeling of the differing rent prices across the country: 

https://www.alle-immobilien.ch/en/rent/trade-industry/subcategory-restaurant/

 

#2 Create a Business Plan

To not get lost in a crowd of culinary establishments it is important to work on a business plan that lets you stand out from the rest. To achieve this, you will need to think of a unique selling proposition. You could think of what kind of customers are likely to purchase your products in the location you have set on before. Are there rather people that might for example need a quick coffee on the go or will your customers be happier with a full menu set up?

 

#3 Legal Requirements Needed

This point might be one of the most cumbersome ones that also takes a lot of time to handle. All cantons will require an operating license and a hygiene concept for self-monitoring also called the HACCP concept (Hazard, Analysis, Critical, Control, Points). This concept should be personalized and adapted to your business. The following link will lead you to a HACCP Template:


https://gastropedia.ch/hygienekonzept-erstellen-selbstkontrolle-in-der-gastronomie/65/

Moreover, depending on the canton you will also be required to hand in further documents and certificates. These might be a host patent, a capability statement, a retail approval for a liquor pub (in case you will sell alcohol), and in some cases, you will have to undermine an assessment regarding food hygiene and addiction prevention. Where you get all documents and have to hand them in is listed in the link below:

https://www.wirtepatent.ch/de/wissen/bewilligungen-gastronomie-145.html

https://www.wirtepatent.ch/de/wirtepatent-3.html

 

#4 Create a Budgeting Plan

Finally, budgeting is an important topic and you should definitely create a detailed and well-thought-out budget plan to avoid any surprise costs. Furthermore, you should prepare yourself well for pitching your idea to your investor as they will also ask unpleasant questions for certain. For this event, you can also set an appointment for a personal consultation concerning the financing of your business. 

https://gastropedia.ch/finanzierung-gastronomie/1862/

 

Have you been chasing a full-time job for too long and are about to get bored at home? Maybe you need to consider career alternatives such as freelancing. You do not have to start your own business right away. There are payroll providers who organize your work permit, payments, social security, and tax payments. We are welcoming your feedback. We are trying to find legitimate and easy ways to earn money online and through platforms. Please send your feedback to monica@globalpeopletransitions.com or comment below the post.

 

Crowdsourcing

http://www.link.ch/?lang=en

I was invited to work on a project for a large recruiting platform. This was real fun and also the reason why I am exploring the idea further. I learnt a lot, had a great exchange with other participants and did more research into a topic I find interesting. Atmosphere was very professional.

 

https://www.hyve.net/de/

Create and account and start contributing to ideas. First project was to come up with an idea for a special service and rate other ideas. I enjoyed this as I could choose and it related to my business so I even thought I learnt something. Not sure if I will get paid and how.

 

Crowdsourcing Platforms in German / French

https://www.entscheiderclub.ch/ueber-uns

 

Freelancing Platforms

www.guru.com

Created a profile to see how it works. You are proposed projects based on your skills (tag specific skills). It is advisable that you transfer your skills from LinkedIn. Guru sends projects based on your skill set. That’s very convenient. Then you hand in a proposal. Within a few days I got selected for a really cool transcription project based on my German. Next step: Do it.

 

www.jobsinzurich.com/?sector=freelance

JobsinZurich is offering specific freelancing roles through individualized search machines. 

 

www.freelancermap.ch/

Freelancermap was once recommended to me by a programmer at a networking event. He said he got work through this platform regularly. It looks more like a platform for IT Professionals.

 

https://www.mturk.com/mturk/welcome

Heard through the grapevine that mturk is a good platform to work from.

 

https://www.upwork.com/

Heard through the grapevine that upwork is a good platform to work from.

 

www.freelance.com

Heard through the grapevine that freelance is a good platform to work from.

 

www.leapforceathome.com/qrp/public/jobs/list?uref=e7ef95699e54a88c3b2da93a6f4495cb

According to a contact, decent pay and work outside the US.

 

www.appen.com

They offer projects and micro tasks that you can start right away from the comfort of your home.

 

www.gignow.com

Gignow is a talent marketplace that matches contract workers with gigs at iconic organizations around the world. (present in 42 countries and growing, not in Switzerland yet).

 

Technical Services

www.mila.com/explore/

On Mila you can offer technical services in Switzerland. You can also receive fast and competent help with any problems regarding your technical devices.

 

Bookreviews on Goodreads

Write book reviews on https://www.goodreads.com/ and become an authority there. Edit books and texts if you are an English native speaker.

 

Support intercultural trainers as a country resource

This has become a great side income for us. We regularly advise expats moving to Switzerland as “country resources”. You can let me know if you are interested in such a work as well for your home county and I could introduce you to trainer colleagues. Payment for two hours is around 200 USD if you are based in Switzerland.

 

  • Technical Aspects

 

How can you work as a freelancer?

As a “third-country” national or EU/EFTA citizen (without a C-permit) you are not allowed to start a company. As a freelancer you will need your own company (sole proprietorship) to be compliant with social security and tax rules in Switzerland or go through a payrolling company.

 

You can work with one of the employment companies from this website:

https://www.thebusinessharbour.ch/

 

Obviously you need to have a work permit in order to work in Switzerland. The B-permit usually allows you to work. With the L-permit a special request to the authority is required.

 

LinkedIn:

Platforms like LinkedIn become more important than ever nowadays. They enable you to build effective connections and provide a great base for networking all from the comfort of your home. In order to find freelance job opportunities you should polish your LinkedIn profile and make it standout. This involves for example filling your bio with relevant information to capture the recruiters interest or adding a professional headshot. Besides, you want recruiters to be aware of your LinkedIn profile. This is where the “Open to Work” feature comes in quite handy as it signals that you are ready to take on a new job. 

 

Additionally, in this world of anonymity it is highly important to personalize your job applications to standout from the crowd. Customizing and tailoring your documents individually towards each company increases your chances of landing the job position. And finally, you should work on what LinkedIn stands for: Networking. Try to build your network as this gives you the possibility to expand your search area. It enables you to talk directly to your first-degree connections but you could also ask your connections to introduce you to mutual connections. This is where the power of networking lies. Finally, it is always advantageous to be present to increase visibility. Sharing valuable insights or interacting with your network is a great beginning. Another thing you could do is to join and engage with industry-specific LinkedIn groups. And  in case you feel extra bold: simply reach out to the hiring manager. 

 

Negative experience

There are a lot of scams and less serious offers out there. The main failure is when they promise you fast money or when you have to pay anything upfront. One danger is as well that you fall into the trap of network marketing (MLM). When you have any doubts please feel free to discuss this with me. It’s also strange when companies ask you for a training fee or anything similar to an advance payment. Also, if you have a negative experience please share it. 

 

Challenges when working from anywhere

Working from anywhere can become a bit lonely, crowded or annoying especially if you do not have an office room. One of the ways to deal with this is to go to a shared office space or work at a café (which is fine as long as you do not have confidential phone conversations).

 

I know freelancers and entrepreneurs who prefer to have an office where they have to go to and dress up for. It might sound weird but the idea of working in PJ can become less romantic after several days. Test out what works for you. For me the secret is in variety. Work one day at home, one in an office and make sure you build networks and meet real people in your break times.

 

If you have many projects to juggle, productivity becomes more important. Let me know if you have a challenge around remaining productive.

 

More on this topic:

Here’s an overview of 25 companies with the most work from home jobs in the US.

http://www.flexjobs.com/blog/post/25-companies-with-the-most-work-from-home-jobs/

 

Further Resources

http://digitalnomadhelp.com/findaremotejob/

The Digital Nomad Series:

The Digital Nomad Part 1: Why I’m inspired to grow Global People Transitions Organically

The Digital Nomad Part 2: Same Old or New Breed?

The Digital Nomad Part 3: Improve Your Productivity Kanban-Style

The Digital Nomad Part 4: How To Be A Global Digital Coach, Consultant or Trainer

The Digital Nomad Part 5: Which Channels To Use in Order to be a More Effective Global Digital Nomad

 

Freelance Writing and Blogging

Please ask me to send you a handout on this topic.

https://globalpeopletransitions.com/guestblogging/

 

FREELANCING
ZebraSkill https://zebraskill.ch/projects/
Toptal https://www.toptal.com/
Free2Freelance https://www.free2freelance.com/
PeoplePerHour https://www.peopleperhour.com/
Freelancer https://www.freelancer.com/
Freelance www.freelance.com
Upwork https://www.upwork.com/
Fiverr https://www.fiverr.com/
Expertlead https://www.expertlead.com/
Guru www.guru.com
Jobs in Zurich www.jobsinzurich.com/?sector=freelance
Freelancer Map www.freelancermap.ch/
Mturk https://www.mturk.com/mturk/welcome
Appen https://appen.com/
ithire https://ithire.com/freelancers
Truelancer https://www.truelancer.com/
99designs https://99designs.de/
Gigster https://gigster.com/
REMOTE JOBS
Dribble (for Designers) https://dribbble.com/
Behance (for Designers) https://www.behance.net/
DeviantArt (for Designers) https://www.deviantart.com/
FlexJobs Writers Category https://www.flexjobs.com/search?search=writer
Freelance Writing https://www.freelancewriting.com/jobs/
Journalism Jobs https://www.journalismjobs.com/job-listings?JobTypeID=4&jobType=4
ProBlogger https://problogger.com/jobs/
Contena (for Writers) https://www.contena.co/jobs
Scripted https://www.scripted.com/become-a-scripted-writer
INTERIM MANDATES / CONSULTING AGENCIES
RGP – Consulting https://careers.rgp.com/
A connect https://www.a-connect.com/
Toptal https://www.toptal.com/
KMU Verband https://www.kmuverband.ch/interims-management.html
Hunterpersonal https://www.hunterpersonal.ch/interim/
RECRUITING AGENCIES
Adecco https://www.adecco.co.uk/
Hays https://www.hays.com/
Randstad https://www.randstad.com/find-randstad-in-your-country/
Newcruitement (specific for CH) www.newcruitment.ch
Hunterpersonal https://www.hunterpersonal.ch/
Badenoch & Clark https://www.badenochandclark.com/
Experis https://www.experis.ch/
Power to Fly https://powertofly.com/jobs/
Globalization Partners https://www.globalization-partners.com/
Wunder Talent https://wundertalent.co.uk/other-roles/
TEMP JOBS (Zeitarbeit)
Career Jet https://www.careerjet.ch/zeitarbeit-jobs.html
Joker Personal https://www.jokerpersonal.ch/
Randstad https://www.randstad.ch/en/job-seeker/
CareerPlus https://www.careerplus.ch/
Career One Step https://www.careeronestop.org/JobSearch/FindJobs/employment-agencies.aspx