Thinking about Starting a Business as an Expat Coach?

A wall full of globes in different sizes.

My Most Significant Learning in Over a Decade of Running an Expat Coach Business

“There’s always an open door.”

I started my Expat Coach Business in 2010 with a blog and officially launched two years later, leaving a well-paid career and jumping ship. I learned that there’s always an open door and that whenever I hit a wall, I needed coaching myself, and then more doors would open. This is one of the rare occasions where I spoke about my journey, and in the last few days, several clients asked me for advice on how to start an Expat Coach Business. So, I’m pulling my thoughts together. Please reach out to me for a consultation.

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Starting an Expat Coach Business in Zurich

requires careful planning and consideration of various factors. Here are some important aspects to focus on:

1. Legal Requirements: Ensure you understand the legal requirements for setting up a business in Zurich, including registering your business, obtaining necessary permits or licenses, and complying with tax regulations. Consulting with a local business attorney or advisor can help you navigate these requirements.

2. Market Research: Conduct thorough market research to understand Zurich’s demand for expat coaching services. Identify your target audience, their needs, preferences, and the competitive landscape. This will help you tailor your services and marketing strategies effectively.

3. Cultural Understanding: Zurich has a unique business culture and customs. Understanding cultural nuances and business etiquette is crucial for building client relationships and credibility. To gain insights into the local culture, consider networking with local expat communities or joining professional organizations.

4. Language Skills: While English is widely spoken in Zurich, having proficiency in German or French can be advantageous, especially when dealing with local clients or navigating administrative processes. Consider enhancing your language skills if necessary.

5. Networking: Networking is essential for building a client base and establishing partnerships in Zurich. Attend industry events, join professional associations, and connect with fellow coaches, expats, and potential clients through online platforms or local meetups.

6. Financial Planning: Develop a solid financial plan that outlines your startup costs, projected income, and expenses. Consider office rent, marketing expenses, insurance, and professional development. It’s also essential to set pricing for your services that reflects the value you provide while remaining competitive in the market.

https://globalpeopletransitions.com/females-food-and-finance/

7. Online Presence: Establish a solid online presence through a professional website and an active presence on social media platforms. Showcase your expertise, testimonials from satisfied clients, and valuable content to attract potential clients and build credibility.

 

We have a series and several blog posts on how to start and improve your online presence.

The Social Media Newbie Series – Part 1 LinkedIn

Offline and Online Presence is the Way Forward for Modern Professionals

8. Continued Learning and Certification: Invest in continuing education and certification programs to stay updated on the latest coaching trends and best practices. This will demonstrate your commitment to professional development and enhance your credibility as a coach.

To gain further insights and guidance specific to starting a business as an expat coach in Zurich, consider reaching out to:

– Local business incubators or entrepreneurship support organizations
– Chambers of Commerce or industry associations in Zurich
– Experienced expat coaches or entrepreneurs in Zurich for mentorship and advice
– Expatriate communities or forums where you can connect with fellow expats and exchange insights
– Professional coaches’ networks or associations for resources and support tailored to your profession

Focusing on these critical areas and seeking advice from relevant sources can help you lay a strong foundation for your expat coaching business in Zurich.

The primary difference between an expat coach and a “normal” coach (often referred to as a life coach, career coach, or executive coach) lies in their specialization and focus on addressing the unique challenges and needs of expatriates or individuals living and working abroad.

We recommend these NETWORKS:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1srsiTHMKS6dNc3Fy-GtzpLELrkLgix1vT1w7hGTW1Ng/edit

 

 

What is an Expat Coach

  1. Understanding of Expatriate Challenges: An expat coach is trained and experienced in understanding the specific challenges faced by individuals who are living, working, or studying abroad. These challenges may include cultural adjustment, language barriers, homesickness, career transitions, cross-cultural relationships, and identity issues.
  2. Global Competency: Expat coaches have a deep understanding of different cultures and cultural dynamics. They can help clients navigate cultural differences, develop cultural competence, and adapt their behavior and communication styles to thrive in a multicultural environment.

The Global Rockstar Album

  1. Relocation Support: Expat coaches provide support and guidance to individuals and families before, during, and after relocation. They help clients prepare for the challenges of moving to a new country, make informed decisions, and effectively manage the transition process. We often connect our clients to relocation experts and other Subject Matter Experts in Zurich so it is important to build a good network.

Moving to Zurich, Switzerland – First Things First 

  1. Career Transition and Development: Expat coaches assist clients in exploring career opportunities abroad, leveraging their skills and experiences in an international context, and overcoming career-related challenges such as job search, networking, and professional development in a new cultural environment.
  2. Personal Development and Well-being: Expat coaches focus on their clients’ holistic well-being, addressing not only career-related concerns but also personal and emotional challenges associated with expatriate life. They help clients build resilience, cope with stress, enhance self-awareness, and develop personal growth and fulfillment strategies.
  3. Cross-Cultural Coaching: Expat coaches provide cross-cultural coaching to help clients navigate cultural differences and develop intercultural competence. They facilitate cultural awareness, sensitivity, and effective communication across cultural boundaries.
  4. Knowledge of International Resources: Expat coaches know of international resources, networks, and support services that can assist clients in accessing information, assistance, and community resources specific to their needs as expatriates.

While the skills and techniques used by expat coaches may overlap with those of other types of coaches, their specialization in expatriate issues and understanding of cross-cultural dynamics distinguish them from “normal” coaches. This specialization enables expat coaches to provide tailored support and guidance to individuals navigating the complexities of living and working abroad.

1 – Obtain Your Basic Training

Check with Sundae Schneider Bean if she offers Global Coach Coalition again. This course is great if you already have a basis and start a coaching practice.

https://www.sundaebean.com/global-coach-coalition/

My coach trainer for individual and group coaching (in Munich, and she only works in German):

https://dr-eva-kinast.de/

This looks interesting, too:

https://coachcampus.com/articles/become-an-expat-coach/

 

2 – Gain More Experience

Initially, you work with test and pilot clients, but you should move to paid clients as soon as someone is willing to pay you. For more practice and coaching hours, you could work with a coaching platform like EZRA and Coach Hub.

https://helloezra.com/why-ezra

https://www.coachhub.com/en/

https://www.cbinsights.com/company/coachhub/alternatives-competitors

https://www.saasworthy.com/product-alternative/35389/coachhub-io

 

3 – Always Continue to Study and Learn

My current training in TA:

https://www.ebi-zuerich.ch/

 

If I did not study at Eric Berne Institute, I would study at IAP. It has an excellent reputation in CH:

https://www.zhaw.ch/de/psychologie/weiterbildung/weiterbildung-nach-themen/coaching-supervision-organisationsberatung/

 

I can also recommend “Transkulturelles Coaching” in Lucerne.

https://www.ikf.ch/de/kurse/cas-transkulturelles-coaching

 

Kirsten Nazarkiewicz and Gesa Krämer’s courses are excellent too.

https://en.consilia-cct.com/news

 

You can check what they offer in English:

https://beedu.ch/en/offer/ikf-mas-transkulturelle-kommunikation-uebersetzen-ikf-hds-sal

 

Not sure about this one yet. It appeared while searching for the 3rd big provider.

Learningsuite

 

4 – Work with a Relocation Management Company (RMC) and Get Listed on Digital Global Mobility Platforms

When I started, I worked with CROWN Relocations, and you can find a Relocation Management Company (RMC) willing to work with you as a freelancer. There are also platforms such as XPATH GLOBAL, but my success in getting work through them is very limited. I’ve been on this platform for a year and have had 0 inquiries.

Handout 113_Helpful Links in Global Mobility_(2024)

5 – Join the Relevant Associations

I certainly recommend you join SIETAR Switzerland and FIGT. Please mention me in both associations as a reference. 

www.sietar.ch

https://www.figt.org/

Keeping up to date with intercultural research is more important than being certified by a general coaching association. I subscribe to the ethical principles of the ICF and keep my competency level updated, but I am not a member (yet).  This might be important for a new coach. As a German speaker on the verge of Swiss citizenship, I would probably join BSO rather than ICF. As an English speaker, the ICF may be better if you plan to move to other countries again.

EZRA 

Coach Hub

 

6 – Accept my Caveats and Reality Check

The term COACH is not protected in Switzerland. Hence, you can call yourself a coach any day now. But that also leads to confusion. Quality and branding are critical, and building a business is not for the faint-hearted. It would help if you had a lot of energy and capacity. It is a full-time job in the first five to ten years, but then you might be able to work less than 50 hours. Read my accounts of the rollercoaster of starting and maintaining a startup company through the first five years. It also always helped me to have a second leg to stand on (as a subject matter expert I am teaching Global Mobility and was pulled into corporate projects during the last decade).

The Digital Nomad – Part 1

 

7 – Ask me for a consultation and coach supervision

While the skills and techniques used by expat coaches may overlap with those of other types of coaches, their specialization in expatriate issues and understanding of cross-cultural dynamics distinguish them from “normal” coaches. This specialization enables expat coaches to provide tailored support and guidance to individuals navigating the complexities of living and working abroad.

As an expat coach, my specialization lies in understanding the unique challenges faced by individuals who are living, working, or studying abroad. I am trained and experienced in helping clients navigate cultural adjustment, language barriers, homesickness, career transitions, cross-cultural relationships, and identity issues.

My deep understanding of different cultures and cultural dynamics allows me to assist clients in adapting their behavior and communication styles to thrive in a multicultural environment. I provide support and guidance to individuals and families before, during, and after relocation, helping them prepare for the challenges of moving to a new country and effectively managing the transition process.

In addition to career-related concerns, I focus on my clients’ holistic well-being, addressing the personal and emotional challenges associated with expatriate life. I help them build resilience, cope with stress, enhance self-awareness, and develop personal growth and fulfillment strategies.

I facilitate cultural awareness, sensitivity, and effective communication across cultural boundaries through cross-cultural coaching. I also provide access to international resources, networks, and support services that can assist clients in accessing information, assistance, and community resources specific to their needs as expatriates.

My specialization in expatriate issues and my understanding of cross-cultural dynamics enable me to provide tailored support and guidance to individuals navigating the complexities of living and working abroad. As a founder and experienced coach, I can also provide coach supervision and consultation on how to start a business in Zurich.

CONTACT ME via https://calendly.com/angieweinberger

MORE NETWORKS:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1srsiTHMKS6dNc3Fy-GtzpLELrkLgix1vT1w7hGTW1Ng/edit

ASK ME

Contact Card 3

Handout 113_Helpful Links in Global Mobility_(2024)

Related:

How to Become a Digital Nomad as a Coach, Trainer or Consultant

Digital Nomad Series

The Digital Nomad – Part 1

 

Expat Coach Angie Weinberger Zurich Switzerland



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